War and Memory in the Twentieth Century

By Martin Evans; Ken Lunn | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Bernice Archer is a Ph.D. student at the University of Essex. Her thesis is a comparative study of civilian internment in the Far East during the Second World War in which she focuses on a small group of camps in China, Hong Kong, Singapore, the Philippines, Java and Sumatra. She is a keen oral historian.

David Cesarani is Professor of Modern Jewish Studies at the University of Southampton. His publications on the Holocaust and Nazi war criminals include, as editor, The Final Solution: Origins and Implementation and Justice Delayed, a study of how Nazi collaborators entered Britain after 1945.

Barry M. Doyle teaches modern British social and political history at the University of Teesside. His research has concentrated on the social, political and cultural world of the Norwich middle class in the early twentieth century. He is currently working on a social history of twentieth-century Britain.

Geoff Eley is Professor of History at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His publications include Reshaping the German Right and From Unification to Nazism: Reinterpreting the German Past.

Martin Evans is Lecturer in French and European Studies at the University of Portsmouth. His research has concentrated on colonialism and post- colonialism. He is the author of The Memory of Resistance: French Opposition to the Algerian War.

Sue Harper teaches cultural history and film at the University of Portsmouth. She has published widely on British cinema, including Picturing the Past: The Rise and Fall of the British Costume Film.

John Hellmann is Professor of English at the Ohio State University, where he teaches at the Lima Campus. He is the author of Fables of Fact: The New Journalism as New Fiction, and American Myth and the Legacy of Vietnam.

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