War and Memory in the Twentieth Century

By Martin Evans; Ken Lunn | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
From the nineteenth-century scrapbook of a "'Mr W.A. of Peckham'", cited in C. Sorenson, "'Theme parks and time machines'", in Verso ( 1989), p. 61.
2.
Remaining bombs were also often 'dumped' over coastal towns by German pilots returning to the Continent after bombing large towns and cities.
3.
Calder ( 1969), p. 164.
4.
Until 1943, more civilians than members of the armed forces were killed in the war. A total of 60,950 people died as a result of the bombing campaigns, of whom about half were women. Summerfield and Braybon ( 1987), pp. 2-3.
5.
Calder ( 1991).
6.
The idea of imagined communities used here is drawn from Anderson ( 1983).
7.
Hewison ( 1987), pp. 86-7.
9.
Yeo and Yeo ( 1988), p. 236.
10.
Duncan and Wallach ( 1980).
11.
Condell ( 1985), p. 34.
12.
The Times, 26 March 1917, p. 20, cited in Condell ( 1985), p. 23.
13.
"'The King's Dedicatory Speech, Crystal Palace, 9 June 1920'", cited in Condell ( 1985), p. 149.
14.
Foster ( 1936), p. 215.
15.
I recognize that this is a vastly simplified definition of history, practitioners of which of course choose to focus on particular areas and claim a special significance for their particular field of research. However, for the purposes of this chapter, it is necessary to define history in this way specifically in relation to heritage. History differs from heritage in the ways in which it is presented to and known by the public, and in the general significance given to particular aspects of the past. Consumption, perhaps, is the key difference between heritage and history.
16.
Merriman ( 1991), p. 8.
17.
Publicity leaflet for the Imperial War Museum, subtitled 'Part of Your Family's History'.
18.
Publicity leaflet for the Winston Churchill Britain at War Theme Museum, 1992.
19.
Ibid.
20.
Ibid.
21.
Calder ( 1969), p. 157. These figures are given for 27 September 1940,

-102-

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