Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics

By Suzanne Romaine | Go to book overview

PREFACE

MODERN linguistics has generally taken for granted that grammars are unrelated to the social lives of their speakers. Thus, linguists have usually treated language as an abstract object which can be accounted for without reference to social concerns of any kind. Sociologists, for their part, have tended to treat society as if it could be constituted without language. I have called this book Language in Society, which is what sociolinguistics is all about. The term 'sociolinguistics' was coined in the 1950s to try to bring together the perspectives of linguists and sociologists to bear on issues concerning the place of language in society, and to address, in particular, the social context of linguistic diversity. Although it is still a young field of research, it gathered momentum in the 1960s and 1970s and continues to do so today. Educational and social policies played a role in the turning of linguists' attention to some of these questions, as did dissatisfaction with prevailing models of linguistics. Since the late 1950s mainstream linguistics has been conceived of as a largely formal enterprise increasingly divorced from the study of languages as they are actually used in everyday life.

Sociolinguistics has close connections with the social sciences, in particular, sociology, anthropology, social psychology, and education. It encompasses the study of multilingualism, social dialects, conversational interaction, attitudes to language, language change, and much more. It is impossible to put all the different approaches to the topic into neat pigeon-holes, each of which is distinct in terms of methodology, goals, etc. There is considerable overlap, so that, for instance, while dialectologists have studied speech varieties and language change, subjects of paramount interest to many sociolinguists, they have generally employed quite different methods of data collection and concentrated on rural rather than urban speech (see Chapter 5).

-vii-

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Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Figures xiv
  • List of Tables xv
  • 1 - Language in Society/Society in Languages 1
  • 2 - Language Choice 33
  • 3 - Sociolinguistic Patterns 67
  • 4 - Language and Gender 99
  • 5 - Linguistic Change in Social Perspective 134
  • 6 - Pidgin and Creole Languages 162
  • 7 - Linguistic Problems as Societal Problems 191
  • 8 - Conclusions 221
  • Index 229
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