Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics

By Suzanne Romaine | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I WROTE this book while I was a visiting professor in Sweden in 1991-2. My biggest debt is therefore to my colleagues at FUMS (Avdelningen för forskning och utbildning i modern svenska) in the Institute for Nordic Languages at the University of Uppsala and to the Swedish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences for awarding me the Kerstin Hesselgren visiting professorship which made my stay possible and rewarding both intellectually and personally. My perception of fundamental sociolinguistic problems has been sharpened by my interaction with my colleagues at FUMS, whose interests and expertise span virtually the whole field of sociolinguistics.

I would also like to thank Isabel Forbes for sending me the article on French usage, and my colleague Olle Josephson at FUMS for bringing the case of nörd to my attention, both of which provide examples for my discussion of linguistic change in Chapter 6. I am also grateful to Nancy C. Dorian for helping me to locate various pieces of information I needed, and to Jim and Lesley Milroy for their helpful comments on the first draft of this book.

Several of the figures and tables in the pages which follow are reproduced or adapted from other sources, and I am grateful to the copyright holders for granting permission for these materials to be used. Figure 1.1 is adapted from A Survey of New Guinea Languages ( Capell 1969): 125, by permission of the University of Sydney. Figure 2.2 is reproduced from Gillian Sankoff's 'Language Use in Multi-lingual Societies', in Sociolinguistics ( Pride and Holmes, eds. 1971; Penguin): 33-51, by permission of the author. The cartoon in Figure 3.1 by Bo Bojesen first appeared in Politiken, 23 March 1963, and is reproduced with the artist's permission. Figure 3.2 is reproduced from William Labov "'The Reflection of Social Processes in Linguistic Structures'", in Readings in the Sociology of Language ( Fishman, ed. 1968): 240-51, by

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Figures xiv
  • List of Tables xv
  • 1 - Language in Society/Society in Languages 1
  • 2 - Language Choice 33
  • 3 - Sociolinguistic Patterns 67
  • 4 - Language and Gender 99
  • 5 - Linguistic Change in Social Perspective 134
  • 6 - Pidgin and Creole Languages 162
  • 7 - Linguistic Problems as Societal Problems 191
  • 8 - Conclusions 221
  • Index 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 235

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.