Acknowledgments

I have been the lucky beneficiary of help from many people in the course of conducting the research reported in this book. Many colleagues at the University of Virginia offered help with methods, logic, and arguments. Chuck Denk, Steve Patterson, and Steve Finkel gave valuable assistance on statistical matters and methods of analysis. Tim Tolson and Doug Lloyd managed to keep my computer running despite the enormous demands made on it.

To my friend and colleague, E. Mavis Hetherington, I offer my most sincere thanks for the many lunches we shared to discuss the ideas in this work. Our conversations and friendship sustained me throughout the project. Margaret Brinig, Paul Kingston, and Steve Rhodes read the entire manuscript at various stages and offered advice and suggestions. Elizabeth Scott at the University of Virginia Law School provided needed guidance in my study of family law and read several chapters of the manuscript. Susan McKinnon and Ellen Contini Morava guided my search of materials in cultural anthropology.

Colleagues elsewhere were equally generous in their help. Suzanne Bianchi at the University of Maryland offered advice on the design of the research. Diane Hansen at the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin gave assistance with the acquisition and analysis of the National Survey of Families and Households. Steve McClosky at the Center for Human Resource Research at the Ohio State University guided me through the acquisition and analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. William Marsiglio at the University of Florida offered suggestions about fatherhood as an element of marriage. Alan Booth and Nan Crouter gave me the chance to present some of the earliest results when they invited me to participate in the Men in Families Conference at Pennsylvania State University.

This work staddles several academic disciplines beyond my own (sociology), including law, anthropology, and psychology. I count myself lucky to have generous colleagues here, and elsewhere, willing to offer assistance to a novice in their fields.

-vii-

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Marriage in Men's Lives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Marriage as a Social Institution 11
  • Conclusion 41
  • 3 - Marriage and Masculinity 43
  • Summary 61
  • 4 - Adult Achievement 63
  • Notes 83
  • 5 - Personal Communities 84
  • Conclusion 107
  • Notes 110
  • 6 - When Men Help Others 112
  • Notes 128
  • 7 - The New Normative Marriage Is It Good for Men? 130
  • Appendix A - Multivariate Results for Chapter 4 Pooled Cross-Section Time-Series with Fixed Effects 143
  • Appendix B - Multivariate Results for Chapter 5 Conditional Change Models 145
  • Appendix C - Multivariate Results for Chapter 6 Conditional Change Models 151
  • References 153
  • Index 161
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