Change in Husband's Relative Income Figure 5.14. Effects of changes in relative income for social contacts with neighbors. Data from the National Survey of Families and Households: 1987-1994.

or became widows reported more (24 and 78, respectively). But getting married, per se, had no measurable consequences. Likewise, changes in the dimensions of normative marriage showed no measurable effects.

These findings mean that men maintain relatively constant levels of involvement with their personal communities before and after they get married. Increases in one type of pursuit are accompanied by decreases in another. Marriage, that is, has effects on men because husbands allocate their time and commitments differently. They do not significantly increase or decrease their total commitments.


Conclusion

This chapter began by considering how marriage might affect the people and organizations men are involved with, their personal communities. It is this collection of close friends, relatives, co-workers, and acquaintances that informs a sense of who one is in important ways. At the most personal level, the lives of men are influenced by their associations with others. Such ties, and the ways men experience and respond to them, cross the strong privacy boundaries erected around marriages and families because they are part of a man's sense of himself and his place in the world. To the many factors known to alter men's personal communities, we must now add changes in their marital status and changes in their marriages.

Marriage does not appear to add or subtract so much as it reorganizes the total amount of contact men have with other people. One of the most obvious ways in which men reorganize their time involves work in the household. Once married, men do less housework than they did when they were bachelors. Other

-107-

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Marriage in Men's Lives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Marriage as a Social Institution 11
  • Conclusion 41
  • 3 - Marriage and Masculinity 43
  • Summary 61
  • 4 - Adult Achievement 63
  • Notes 83
  • 5 - Personal Communities 84
  • Conclusion 107
  • Notes 110
  • 6 - When Men Help Others 112
  • Notes 128
  • 7 - The New Normative Marriage Is It Good for Men? 130
  • Appendix A - Multivariate Results for Chapter 4 Pooled Cross-Section Time-Series with Fixed Effects 143
  • Appendix B - Multivariate Results for Chapter 5 Conditional Change Models 145
  • Appendix C - Multivariate Results for Chapter 6 Conditional Change Models 151
  • References 153
  • Index 161
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