The Soviet Union and the Challenge of the Future - Vol. 1

By Alexander Shromas; Morton A. Kaplan | Go to book overview

autonomy in exchange for firm guarantees on the part of those nations of the inviolability of Russian national interests within respective national territories.

3. The third problem is that of putting an end to more than sixty years of artificial, purely ideologically-motivated and, by no rational standards necessary, confrontation between the East and the West, and of establishing, in accordance with the national interests of all parties involved, a pattern of Russia's genuine cooperation with the Western world, above all with the other superpower -- the U.S.A. This problem will be of special importance and its settlement of paramount urgency as it will, among other things, create the pattern of international stability and cooperation between major powers of the world, without which it would be virtually impossible to achieve a reliable settlement of the second problem of settling intra-national relations within the present Soviet realm of rule, as well as of other international issues in which Russia has a vital interest (e.g. the Sino-Russian conflict), and also very difficult to accelerate adequately Russia's economic development.

With Russia busy settling the above issues, both the present Soviet realm and the entire world should become much safer and better to live in.


NOTES

The fundamental research for this section was carried out when the author was a Visiting Scholar at the Hoover Institution, for whose generous support he wishes to acknowledge found gratitude.

1
"Left-Wing Communism -- An Infantile Disorder" ( 1920), quoted from Robert C. Tucker , ed., The Lenin Anthology ( New York: Norton, 1975), 602. Lenin repeated here the idea he had first formulated and elaborated at greater length in his longish article, "The Downfall of the Second International" (Summer 1915). There, however, he talks, in the same terms, about the symptoms of a revolutionary situation only, whereas in "Left-Wing Communism," he unequivocally declares the quoted formula to be "the fundamental law of revolution."
2
Republic, 545d, (quoted from J. Adam's edition of Republic of Plato, Vol. II).
3
Ibid. (quoted from A.D. Lindsay's edition of Plato, The Republic).
4
The term "great revolution" was used by many theorists and philosophers, inclusive of de Tocqueville and Marx, but was defined as "reconstitution of the state" by George S. Pettee with a special view of providing a taxonomical distinction between revolution proper and all other political change brought about by drastic and/or violent means (such as putsch, coup d'etat, etc.). For further reference, see George S. Pettee, The Process of Revolution ( New York: Harper & Brothers, 1938), 3ff.

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Soviet Union and the Challenge of the Future - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 555

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.