The Soviet Union and the Challenge of the Future - Vol. 1

By Alexander Shromas; Morton A. Kaplan | Go to book overview

recognize that without the Russian national and religious rebirth movement any anti-totalitarian coalition would have little chance to succeed.

All in all, the debate about the Soviet future clearly demonstrates that virtually all alternatives to the present régime are not only compatible with the interests of the free world, but promise to eliminate exactly those features of the present régime which inherently make it an enemy of peace, freedom, and human dignity. A future Russia may never become a copy of Western democracies, but it will certainly be their friend and partner in creating a better world.


NOTES
1
Andrei Sakharov, A. Sakharov v bor'be za mir ( A. Sakharov in the struggle for peace), a collection incl. "Razmyshleniia o progresse, mirnom sosushchestvovanii i intellektual'noi svobode" (Thoughts about progress, peaceful coexistence, and intellectual freedom), (Frankfurt am Main: Posev, 1973), 9-65. Since it was originally published under the title, Memorandum Akademika A. Sakharova (Posev, 1970), I refer to Sakharov's work as the memorandum. One of the early English editions was Progress, Coexistence and Intellectual Freedom ( New York: Norton, 1968). Quotations are from English language publications, if available.
2
Andrei Amalrik, Will the Soviet Union Survive Until 1984? ( London: Penguin, 1970), 26. For the Russian original see Prosushchestvuet li Sovetskii Soiuz do 1984 goda? ( Amsterdam: Herzen Foundation, 1970).
3
Alexander Solzhenitsyn et al., From Under the Rubble ( Boston, Toronto: Little, Brown and Co., 1974).
5
Ibid., 135. In "Repentance and Self-Limitation" Solzhenitsyn chiefly polemicizes against the anonymous NN's article "Metanoia" and the pseudonymous Gorsky's article "Russian Messianism," both of which were published in the Vestnik Russkogo Khristianskogo Dvizheniia ( Paris, France), No. 97.
7
Ibid., 257. In "The Smatterers" Solzhenitsyn polemicizes against Altaev's article "The Dual Consciousness of Intelligentsia and Pseudo-culture" and Chelnov "What Is to Be Done?" (both in Vestnik, No. 97); L. Ventsov "Think!" ( Vestnik, No. 99), as well as against several samizdat articles by Semyon Telegin and G. Pomerants.

-389-

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