The Regime of Straits in International Law

By Bing Bing Jia | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book is an updated version of my thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the Faculty of Law, University of Oxford, in 1995.

I am greatly indebted to my supervisor, Professor Ian Brownlie of All Souls College, Oxford, for his advice, attention, and encouragement in the development of the thesis. His supervision went beyond merely the academic aspect of my Oxford years. I am also very grateful to Dr Christine Gray of St Hilda's College whose kindness and help have always been available, and to my examiners, Professor Derrick Wyatt and Dr Vaughan Lowe for making my viva voce a stimulating experience.

Study for this degree would never have been possible had Professor Arnór Hannibalsson, of Iceland University, not provided for my living expenses for three years. To him I ever owe profound gratitude. Many thanks are also due to Wolfson College, Oxford, which granted me a three-year bursary, besides help in many other forms. The university fees were covered by an Overseas Research Scheme Award, provided by the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals for England and Wales, and an Oxford University Scholarship (Bursary), provided by the Graduate Studies Office of the University. I would also like to mention my brother, Jonathan Jia, and his wife, Rebecca, who supported me financially (of course their support was far more than that).

My thanks also extend to Mr Valencia-Ospina, the Registrar of the International Court of Justice; the Secretariat of the International Civil Aviation Organization; Mr David Anderson of the FCO, London; and Professor Akira Mayama of Konan University. I recall with much gratitude the help of the staff of the Bodleian Law Library and the Codrington Library of All Souls College, Oxford. Mr Richard Hart, Ms Elissa Soave and Ms Myfanwy Milton of the OUP and Ms Kate Elliott, my copy-editor, deserve special mention for their efforts in editing this book.

Finally, I thank my parents for their unfailing love. The same feeling is extended to my family in Iceland. Thanks are also due to my fellow students at Oxford for their friendship.

-ix-

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