Ruskin and Oxford: The Art of Education

By Robert Hewison; Ashmolean Museum, Sheffield City Museums, Mappin Art Gallery | Go to book overview

AUTHOR'S ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My thanks must go first of all to the Master and the Directors of the Guild of St George for making this work possible by funding the necessary research. I am also very grateful to Stephen Farthing, Ruskin Master at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, for suggesting the theme of the exhibition, and to Timothy Wilson, Keeper of Western Art at the Ashmolean Museum, for encouraging it to go ahead. The support I have received from him, and from Jon Whiteley, Senior Assistant Keeper in the Department of Western Art, has been invaluable. Janet Barnes, in her former capacity as Principal Keeper of the Ruskin Gallery, Sheffield and now as Senior Principal Keeper at Sheffield's City Museum and Mappin Art Gallery, has been extremely helpful in enabling the exhibition to have a longer life and to be more widely seen. The co-operation between the Guild of St George, the Ashmolean Museum, and the Ruskin School of Drawing, and indeed the other institutions, all with Ruskin connections, who have contributed to this exhibition is a tribute to the continuing vigour of Ruskin's influence.

I am very glad of this opportunity to acknowledge a long-standing debt to Joy Law, who commissioned me to make a new edition of Ruskin's catalogue to the Rudimentary Series for the Lion and Unicorn Press at the Royal College of Art. Published in 1984 as The Ruskin Art Collection at Oxford: Catalogue of the Rudimentary Series, this work gave me a head start on the present project. Neither that publication nor this one would have been possible without the work undertaken by Gerald Taylor, former Senior Assistant Keeper of Western Art at the Ashmolean, in ensuring the conservation of the Ruskin Art Collection at a time when its overall value was less appreciated.

The Ruskin School of Drawing has lent sculpture, furniture, and archive material, and I am very grateful for the help and co-operation I have received. I should like to thank the Dean of Christ Church, the Very Reverend John Drury, for facilitating the loan of Ruskin's drawing of Tom Quad, and the Governing Body of Christ Church for formally agreeing to it. Lucy Whitaker, Assistant Curator at the Christ Church Gallery, has been most helpful. Vicky Slowe, Project Officer at the Ruskin Museum, Coniston very kindly gave me all the information and assistance I needed, and I thank the Trustees of the Ruskin Museum for agreeing to their loan of one drawing. Likewise I am very grateful to Evelyn Murray, Warden of the Working Men's College, for access to the College's archives, and for agreeing to the loan of a drawing. Finally I should like to thank James Dearden, Curator of the Ruskin Galleries at Bembridge School, for his invaluable help in arranging loans on behalf

-ix-

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Ruskin and Oxford: The Art of Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Author's Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • List of Color Plates xii
  • Introduction to the Exhibition xiii
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • Introductory Essay A Graduate of Oxford 1
  • The Catalogue 47
  • Index 151
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