William Beveridge: A Biography

By Jose Harris | Go to book overview

18
FATHER OF THE WELFARE STATE?

I

BEVERIDGE'S defeat at Berwick marked the end of his hopes that he would be personally involved in implementing the Beveridge Plan as a minister in a post-war coalition government. It marked also the end of his brief career in the House of Commons. In the following year he was invited to stand again as an independent candidate for the Northern Universities, but was dissuaded from doing so by his Liberal colleagues who did not want to lose one of their few remaining electoral assets.1 A few months later he accepted a peerage from Clement Attlee and took his seat in the upper house as Baron Beveridge of Tuggal, becoming leader of the Liberals in the House of Lords. From this position he contributed to debates on the programme of legislation that enacted many parts of the Beveridge Plan -- the National Insurance Act, Industrial Injuries Act, and National Health Service Act of 1946 and the National Assistance Act of 1948. At no stage was he ever consulted by any of the relevant government departments about his Plan; but nevertheless many of his recommendations were acted upon much more swiftly and thoroughly than is the usual lot of ambitious social reformers. It is true that there were some important deviations from Beveridge's 1942 proposals. Family allowances had been introduced by the outgoing coalition government in 1945 at a much lower rate than Beveridge had suggested. Old-age pensions were introduced by Labour in 1946 at a slightly higher rate than in Beveridge's scheme, but with no commitment to a build-up towards subsistence. Approved societies were totally abolished (despite the fact that nearly two hundred Labour MPs had given election pledges to retain them as voluntary agents within the state system). Industrial assurance was never nationalized; and some of Beveridge's more innovatory fringe benefits -- such as the furnishing allowance on marriage, and domestic service benefit for sick housewives -- were quietly dropped. But the main structure and

____________________
1
Samuel Papers, A 155, XII, WHB to Lord Samuel, 27 Jan. 1946. Whether Beveridge was really an electoral asset for the Liberals is perhaps open to question. Mass Observation surveys after the 1945 election found a surprising degree of popular indignation that Beveridge had lost his seat; but many of those surveyed were under the impression that Beveridge was in the Labour Party.

-451-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Beveridge: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 511

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.