The Expedition of the Donner Party and Its Tragic Fate

By Eliza P. Donner Houghton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
INDIAN DEPREDATIONS -- WOLFINGERS'S DISAPPEARANCE -- STANTON BETURNS WITH SUPPLIES FURNISHED BY CAPTAIN SUTTER -- DONNER WAGONS SEPARATED FROM TRAIN FOREVER -- TERRIBLE PIECE OF NEWS -- FORCED INTO SHELTER AT DONNER LAKE -- DONNER CAMP ON PROSSER CREEK.

ALL who managed to get beyond the sink of Ogden's River before midnight of October 12, reached Geyser Springs without further molestation, but the belated, who encamped at the sink were surprised at daylight by the Indians, who, while the herders were hurriedly taking a cup of coffee, swooped down and killed twenty-one head of cattle. Among the number were all of Mr. Eddy's stock, except an ox and a cow that would not work together. Maddened by his appalling situation, Eddy called for vengeance on his despoilers, and would have rushed to certain death, if the breaking of the lock of his rifle at the start had not stopped him.

Sullen and dejected, he cached the contents of his wagons, and with a meagre supply of food in a pack on his back, he and his wife, each carrying a child, set forth to finish the journey on foot. To add to their discomfort, they saw Indians on adjacent hills dancing and gesticulating in savage delight. In relating the above occurrence after the

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