The Expedition of the Donner Party and Its Tragic Fate

By Eliza P. Donner Houghton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX .
I RETURN TO GRANDMA -- WAR RUMORS AT THE FORT -- LINGERING HOPE THAT MY MOTHER MIGHT BE LIVING -- AN INDIAN CONVOY -- THE BRUNNERS AND THEIR HOME

THE Spring of 1848 was at hand when my brother- in-law said to me, "Grandma Brunner wants you to come back to her; and if you would like to go, I'll take you to the Fort, as soon as the weather changes, and leave you with the people who are getting ready to move north and are willing to take you with them to Sonoma, where grandma now lives."

The storm was not over, but the day was promising, when my bundle of clothes was again on the pommel of the saddle, and I ready to begin my journey. I was so excited that I could hardly get around to say goodbye to those who had gathered to see me off. We returned by the same route that we had followed out on that warm June day, but everything seemed different. The catkins on the willows were forming and the plain was green with young grass.

As we neared the Fort we passed a large camp of fine-looking Indians who, I was told, were the friendly Walla-Wallas, that came every spring to trade ponies, and otter, and beaver-skins with Captain Sutter for provisions, blankets, beads, gun caps, shot, and powder.

-165-

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