The Karamazov Brothers

By Fyodor Dostoevsky; Ignat Avsey | Go to book overview

BOOK TEN
Schoolboys

1
KOLYA KRASOTKIN

THE beginning of November; the temperature in our parts dropped to minus eleven degrees, and the roads became icy. A little dry snow fell on the frozen earth in the night, a wind, 'dry and sharp',* picked it up and whirled it in flurries around the mean streets of our little town, and particularly around the market square. A murky morning, but the snow had stopped. Not far from the square, near the Plotnikovs' shop, stands the small house, neat and tidy both inside and out, of the widow of the civil servant Krasotkin. Krasotkin himself, a provincial secretary, had died a long time before, about fourteen years ago, but his widow, thirty years old and still quite an attractive little woman, is still with us, living 'on her capital' in her neat little house. She leads an honest and humble life, and has a gentle but cheerful character. She was only about eighteen when, after barely a year of marriage and just after the birth of their son, her husband died. From that time, from the moment of his death, she had devoted herself to bringing up her beloved little Kolya, and although she had loved him to distraction all his fourteen years, she had nevertheless, of course, experienced far more suffering than joy on his account, trembling and dying of fear almost every day, afraid that he might fall ill, catch cold, do something naughty, climb on a chair and fall off, and so on and so forth. When Kolya started elementary school and then entered our high school, his mother enthusiastically set about studying all the subjects so that she could help him and revise all his lessons with him; she made it her business to get to know the teachers and their wives, she even fussed over Kolya's schoolmates, flattering them, so that they would not pick on Kolya or

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The Karamazov Brothers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Translator's Note xxix
  • Texts Used xxxi
  • Select Bibliography xxxii
  • Chronology of Fyodor Dostoevsky xxxiii
  • Principal Characters xxxv
  • From the Author 5
  • Part One 7
  • Book One the Story of a Family 9
  • Book Two an Unseemly Encounter 43
  • Book Three Sensualists 117
  • Part Two 203
  • Book Four Crises 205
  • Book Five Pros and Cons 267
  • Book Six a Russian Monk 353
  • Part Three 409
  • Book Seven Alyosha 411
  • Book Eight Mitya 459
  • Book Nine Judicial Investigation 561
  • Part Four 645
  • Book Ten Schoolboys 647
  • Book Eleven Ivan Fyodorovich 705
  • Book Twelve Judicial Mistake 823
  • Epilogue 949
  • Explanatory Notes 975
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