Higher Education: Resources and Finance

By Seymour E. Harris | Go to book overview
to private institutions in the form of building or scholarship aid rather than set up new public institutions.In this connection the practice of the private Association of Claremont Colleges in California is of some interest. In the rapid growth of the Pomona area in the 1920s the Pomona College authorities decided not to expand lest the college become too large. Instead it was decided to start new units of a few hundred students when this was deemed expedient. In this manner the new unit can lean on the old units, and the additional costs required, say, for 200 additional students can be revealed. At the same time the new small unit can show in the economies ( 1960) of five colleges cooperating, with a total enrollment of 2,200.In later chapters the issues of costs and economies are discussed much more fully.
SUMMARY
Here are several conclusions to be drawn from this chapter.
1. The trend in the last generation is for tuition income to fall in relation to general and educational income and even more in relation to per capita income, the best index of capacity to pay.
2. But the relative decline must be adjusted for two items: first, the exclusion of capital charges of about $300 to $400 per student, an exclusion which results in overstatement of the tuition contribution; second, the inclusion of expenditures not primarily to be tethered to instruction. Their inclusion reduces the relative contribution of tuition less than the first factor results in overvaluation of tuition.
3. From various sources, the conclusion is drawn that tuition in public IHL tends to rise relatively more than in private IHL, in the 1940s though probably not in the 1950s, and nonresident fees in the former more than resident.
4. Does it pay to increase enrollment by keeping tuition down? It is necessary to weigh the rise of costs with a given increase of enrollment against the additional revenue received. Some crude estimates are presented in the text. Generally, the larger the excess capacity and the higher the tuition in relation to total costs, the more likely financial conditions would improve with increases of enrollment.
5. Any disposition to keep tuition down and enrollment up on the theory that the gains of tuition with increased enrollment would exceed those of costs is to be put against the reduced yield of endowment income per student. In real dollars per student, despite large increases, endowment plays a declining part, and in relation to costs per student, the contribution of endowment per resident student declines even more. Hence when a college depends heavily on endowment, its finances may deteriorate even if,

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