Great Britain, France, and the German Problem, 1918-1939: A Study of Anglo-French Relations in the Making and Maintenance of the Versailles Settlement

By W. M. Jordan | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

By Professor C. K. Webster

THIS study makes painful but salutary reading. It faces relentlessly certain facts which have produced the world in which we now live. It is the most rigorous analysis of Franco- British differences penned in this country. It is objective, and the author has taken the greatest care to be as fair to France as to Britain. He has digested practically all the evidence published, and, if much more will one day be revealed from the archives, the picture that he draws is a convincing one. His conclusions are solidly based on facts patiently ascertained from the study of many documents.

He does not pretend to give the whole picture. He leaves out, or only sketches in outline, the relation of the two Powers to the League system and to Soviet Russia. By so doing he focuses our attention on reparation, security, and disarmament, the subjects on which such fatal disagreements arose. In no other work of which I am aware has the difference of outlook and its disastrous effect upon action been so clearly revealed.

It is the usual and perhaps wholesome habit of Englishmen to forget past history. But let us remember that the French do not forget. The history of these years will live in their memory. In order that such misunderstandings may not recur, we too must remember it, however different the situation may seem to be when this war is over.

In peace as in war, the best is often the enemy of the good. There is more than one way to victory, but it is essential that a choice be made and consistently followed. Too often, both in war and peace, the choice is too long delayed. Coalitions in war have always been specially liable to develop this weakness. Only patient and skilled diplomacy on the part of statesmen and soldiers can overcome it. Only immediate and recognizable danger of defeat can produce the necessary unity of action.

After 1918 we had a coalition of peace, but how soon it lost its cohesion! The United States fell away immediately. Italian relations with France were fatally impaired by the peace negotiations and by the rise of Fascism. France and Britain remained. During the Great War their relations had been closer than those of any other two Powers. Their statesmen had been in continuous and close association. British armies had fought under a French Commander-in-Chief. If France had borne the main burden of the war in 1914-1916, Britain had in 1917-1918 redressed the

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Great Britain, France, and the German Problem, 1918-1939: A Study of Anglo-French Relations in the Making and Maintenance of the Versailles Settlement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.