Great Britain, France, and the German Problem, 1918-1939: A Study of Anglo-French Relations in the Making and Maintenance of the Versailles Settlement

By W. M. Jordan | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
PAGE
FOREWORD BY PROFESSOR C. K. WEBSTER v
PRINCIPAL ABBREVIATIONSviii
PREFACEix
CHAP.
I. CONCEPTS OF PEACE: 1914-19181

The formulation of Allied war aims and the acceptance of the Fourteen Points as the bases of peace.

II. ARMISTICE AND PEACE: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE MILITARY TERMS13

The preparation of the military and naval terms of armistice and their relationship to Allied war aims.

III. THE CONFERENCE AND THE TREATY31

A sketch of the Peace Conference. The British and French reception of the Treaty.

IV. THE VICISSITUDES OF POLICY AND OPINION: 1920-193044

The salient characteristics of the main phases of Anglo-French Relations during the first decade.

V. THE AGENCIES OF ALLIED CO-OPERATION57

The Supreme Council; the Conference of Ambassadors; the Inter- allied Military Commission; the Reparation Commission; the Rhineland High Commission.

VI. THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE TREATY66
(i) The problem of sanctions for the enforcement of Treaty obligations, 1919-1924.
(ii) The Rhineland occupation as guarantee of the execution of the Treaty.
VII. CONCILIATION BY CONFERENCE85

An examination of the causes of success and failure of the Conferences of the first decade.

VIII. THE HISTORY OF REPARATION102

A brief historical survey.

IX. REPARATION: THE FACTORS OF DISCORD111

What Germany was to pay for: the dispute in 1919. The change in the British attitude, 1920. The economic preoccupation of Great Britain and the financial preoccupation of France. The dispute concerning Germany's capacity to pay. Distribution of reparation. War debts.

X. REPARATION: THE PROBLEM OF GUARANTEES120

Guarantees for the payment of reparation: proposals and experiments of 1919-1924. Control under the Dawes Plan. Productive guarantees.

-x-

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