Great Britain, France, and the German Problem, 1918-1939: A Study of Anglo-French Relations in the Making and Maintenance of the Versailles Settlement

By W. M. Jordan | Go to book overview

arrangement adapted to the conditions of the European continent. The purpose of the Herriot Plan was to effect this integration. It contemplated the division of the states of the world into three concentric circles. The outermost circle was to include all the Powers represented at the Disarmament Conference--by implication, therefore, the U.S.A. In the event of a breach, or threat of breach, of the Kellogg Pact these Powers were to concert together 'with a view to appealing to public opinion and agreeing upon the steps to be taken.' In application of the Kellogg Pact they were to break off all financial and economic relations with an aggressor state and to refuse recognition 'of any de facto situation brought about in consequence of the violation of an international undertaking.' The second circle was to consist of members of the League who were to be required to give full effect to their obligations under the Covenant and under supplementary treaties. For the innermost circle of European states a special organization was proposed. They were to enter into political agreements providing for mutual assistance against aggression and for the peaceful settlement of disputes; and they were to accept special military arrangements, involving on the one hand the reorganization of their national armies and on the other the provision of military forces at the disposal of the League. Great Britain was included, not within the innermost circle of Continental states, but within the second circle of states bound by the obligations of the Covenant and of supplementary treaties. The fate of the Herriot Plan belongs to the general history of the Disarmament Conference; the discussion to which it gave rise cannot be summarized here. It may, however, be noted that more than one of the European states intimated its refusal to enter into special Continental arrangements unless Great Britain fully participated.


CHAPTER XVII
THE EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK

THE Great War resulted in the breakdown of the three great empires which had in 1914 dominated eastern and central Europe. From their ruins emerged the small national states whose existence was consecrated by the Treaties of Versailles, Saint-Germain, and Trianon. It is beyond the competence of the writer to explore the many political and economic problems to which this reorganization of the European states system gave rise. An adequate study would involve prolonged research. It is, therefore, in a somewhat tentative spirit that questions relating

-218-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Great Britain, France, and the German Problem, 1918-1939: A Study of Anglo-French Relations in the Making and Maintenance of the Versailles Settlement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.