APPENDIX TWO LETTERS TO WILLIAM ROSSETTI

January 2, 1895

*MY DEAR MR. ROSSETTI,

It was with great sorrow that I saw recorded in the newspaper the death of dear Christina, which adds another heavy grief to those that you have of late had to bear.

We have comfort in knowing that her sufferings are now at an end, and with her firm belief in a future life we are sure she was more than willing to go. Although for years I have known we should never meet again there was always the feeling that one was honoured by her love and sympathy. I know of none other so good and noble.

With great regard Yours very truly Alice Boyd* 1

The Pines Putney Hill London. S.W. June 10th, 1895

MY DEAR AND ALWAYS KIND AND TRUE FRIEND,

Watts had of course told me last evening about his interview with you in the morning, and your more than kind intention to give me the memorial of your sister which I shall always treasure as a really and naturally sacred relic. None other could be so precious as the table cover hallowed by her use at the very last. But even more precious than any relic is your assurance of her regard for me. I need not tell you, of all people, how deep was my admiration of her genius, or how sincere and cordial my feeling towards her, which I hope you will not think it presumptuous of me to say was nothing short of affection. Slight and short and intermittent as was our actual acquaintance or intercourse, no slighter word would at all express my sense of her beautiful nature and its inevitable spiritual attractiveness for anyone not utterly unworthy to breathe the same air with her. It is so difficult to express this

-409-

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