Ananaikyo is a syncretic postwar new religion whose founder, Nakano Yonosuke, was originally a member of Omotokyo. In 1949, a year after the death of Omoto's founder, Nakano founded his religion. Though its teachings are almost identical with Omoto's, and relations between the two religions are cordial, Ananaikyo does not consider itself a branch-off from Omoto.

There are two large centers, one in Kurume in Kyushu, and the other, which is also the headquarters, in Shimizu, Shizuoka Prefecture. Ananaikyo is quite famous for the international religious conferences it organized and for the observatories which it has built all over Japan in recent years.

The name of the religion is coined from the word ananai, an old Japanese word which means "to tie," and the usual suffix- like kyo, the idea being that this is a religion which ties man to God, or builds a bridge between earth and heaven. The characters used, however, are the ones for the numbers three and five. They are read "ananai" but visually they have a different symbolism: the three is heaven, earth, and man; the five represents the five great religions of the world.


Founding and History

Nakano Yonosuke, the founder and present leader of Ananaikyo, was born in 1887. He started his religious activity well before World War II, having studied under Master Honda's pupil Nagasawa Katsutate. He was a fellow student of Ueda Kisaburo

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The New Religions of Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • Preface 11
  • Note: 14
  • I - The Old" New Religions" 33
  • 2: Kurozumikyo 67
  • 3: Konkokyo 77
  • II - The Nichiren Group 79
  • 1: Soka Gakkai 106
  • 2 - Reiyukai 109
  • 3 - Rissho Kosei Kai 117
  • III - The Omoto Group 127
  • 1 - Omoto 127
  • 2 - Ananaikyo 143
  • 3 - Seicho No Ie 153
  • 4 - Sekai Kyusei Kyo 173
  • 5 - Pl Kyodan 183
  • IV - Miscellaneous New Religions 199
  • 1 - Tensho Kotai Jingu Kyo 199
  • 2 - Ittoen 221
  • Various Other New Religions 235
  • General Information 245
  • Notes 251
  • Bibliography 259
  • Index 265
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