My Garden of Memory: An Autobiography

By Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin | Go to book overview

THE Riverside Library


MY Garden of Memory
An Autobiography

By KATE DOUGLAS WIGGIN

BOSTON AND NEW YORK HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY The Riverside Press Cambridge 1929

-xv-

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My Garden of Memory: An Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents vii
  • Title Page xv
  • Foreword xvii
  • I- "I Remember" 1
  • II- Childhood Plays and Pleasures 10
  • III- Diary of a "Truly" Little Girl 19
  • IV- Beginning of Hero-Worship 28
  • V- A Journey with Dickens 35
  • VI- School Days and Home Teaching 44
  • VII- "Stepping Westward" 54
  • VIII- Girlhood Gayeties 61
  • IX- An Operatic Friendship 69
  • X- A Turn in the Road 79
  • XI- A Fairy Godmother 88
  • XII- The Study of Kindergarten 100
  • XIII- Learning to Teach 115
  • XIV- Teaching versus Acting 127
  • XV- The Concord School of Philosophy 146
  • XVI- Marriage and Authorship 159
  • XVII- Friendships That Counted 167
  • XVIII- A First Journey to Europe 178
  • XIX- A Hungarian Countess 194
  • XX- An English Country House 208
  • XXI- A New Career 216
  • XXII- Semi-Professional Readings 227
  • XXIII- London Experiences 234
  • XXIV- A Reunited Family 245
  • XXV- The State O'' Maine Beckons 254
  • XXVI- An Ocean Romance 263
  • XXVII- A Wedding Journey 274
  • XXVIII- Dinners to Celebrities 284
  • XXIX- London and Oxford 295
  • XXX- Edinburgh and Holyrood Palace 308
  • XXXI- Experiences in Erin 315
  • XXXII- Books and Their Backgrounds 322
  • XXXIII- Collaborations- Translations 340
  • XXXIV- A Change of Scene 355
  • XXXV- The Barn That Came to Life 367
  • XXXVI- The Barn''s Hospitalities 378
  • XXXVII- A Village Dorcas Society 385
  • Xxxviii Adventures of a Playwright 393
  • Xxxix Rebecca Goes to London 403
  • Xl "Entertaining Strangers" 416
  • Xli the Heart of the Home 427
  • Xlii "The Song is Never Ended!" 435
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