The Sacred Thread: Hinduism in Its Continuity and Diversity

By J. L. Brockington | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
The Orthodox Synthesis

The ruling groups among these invading peoples, the Yavanas (=Greeks). Śakas and Pahlavas, are among those to whom a place is assigned in the Manusmṛti, in a process of accommodating the new social realities to the theoretical pattern. From the beginning of the Christian era the older Dharmasūtras. which had been closely linked to the ritual schools, were expanded and remodelled in verse form to become the group of texts known as the Dharmaśāstras. No longer tied to a particular Vedic school, the Dharmaśāstras aimed to prescribe rules which were authoritative for all of society with a consequent enlargement in their scope and content. The earliest and most famous of these texts is that of Manu, the Manusmṛti or Mānavadharmaśāstra, which probably attained its present form around the second century A.D. The work presents itself, not as the work of a named teacher like most of the Dharmasūtras, but as the dharma declared by Brahmā to Manu, the first man, and passed on by him through Bhṛgu, one of the ten great sages. This claim to divine origin made by all the Dharmaśāstras is intended to secure their general acceptance.

After an introductory chapter in which Manu at the request of the sages describes the creation of the world by Brahmā and his own birth, the Manusmṛti then expounds the sources of dharma and enumerates the main ceremonies from birth to the end of the student stage of life in the second chapter, followed by the householder in the next three, and the last two stages of life in the sixth chapter. Here already a development is seen. Although the Dharmasūtras recognise the four styles of life (āśramas), they do not make them successive but rather present them as the four possible modes of life open to the student after he has completed his basic education; indeed two of the Dharmasūtras reject the multiplicity of āśramas. However, with the growing importance of renunciation, attested to a limited extent in the Upaniṣads and very obvious in the heterodox movements, such rejection was impractical. But so too was the open-ended acceptance of it in other Dharmasūtras. A way

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sacred Thread: Hinduism in Its Continuity and Diversity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Chapter One - Prehistory of Hinduism 1
  • Chapter Two - Impersonal Trends 29
  • Chapter Three - Theistic Trends 51
  • Chapter Four - Unorthodox Movements 74
  • Chapter Five - the Orthodox Synthesis 92
  • Chapter Six - Sectarian Developments 113
  • Chapter Seven - Bhakti in the South 130
  • Chapter Eight Bhakti in the North 151
  • Chapter Nine Revival and Reform 173
  • Chapter Ten Tradition Triumphant 190
  • Bibliography 210
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.