U.S. Forces in the Middle East: Resources and Capabilities

By Anthony H. Cordesman | Go to book overview

3
The Impact of Strategy: "Base Force" and "Bottom Up Review"

The shifts that the US has made in its strategy and force plans have also had an important impact on US contingency capabilities. They too reflect the impact of fundamental changes in East-West relations, and of the end of the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the Warsaw Pact. They also reflect the impact of major breakthroughs in arms control, such as the INF Treaty and START. As a result, the US has been able to change the focus of its military strategy and force plans to concentrate largely on regional contingencies.


The First Post-Cold War Force Plan: The Bush Administration "Base Force"

These changes in strategy and force plans began during the late 1980s. President Reagan and President Bush signed several of the most sweeping arms control agreements in history. These agreements ended Warsaw Pact superiority in conventional forces, eliminated the deployment of most theater nuclear weapons, and put the US on a path that would reduce the strategic nuclear threat to the United States from more than 20,000 weapons to 3,000.

By 1990, these trends had reached the point where a comprehensive review of US strategy and forces was inevitable, and led the Bush Administration to develop the "Base Force" plan. This plan was developed in late 1989 and the spring of 1990 under the leadership of Secretary of Defense Richard Cheney and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs General Colin Powell, and was announced on August 1, 1990. It reflected the Bush Administration's effort to define both the changes the US should make in its forces during the period from 1990-1997, and to establish a floor under the cuts the Congress would make in defense spending.

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Forces in the Middle East: Resources and Capabilities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 145

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.