Gods and Heroes of the Greeks: The Library of Apollodorus

By Apollodorus; Michael Simpson et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
The Family of Agenor: Europa, Cadmus, and Minos; Cadmus' Founding of Thebes; Oedipus; the Seven Against Thebes; the Epigoni (3. 1. 1-3. 7. 7)

BOOK 3 1 Now that I have narrated the story of the line of Inachus from Belus down to the descendants of Heracles, I shall tell of Agenor. For as I said above [ 2. 1. 4], Libya had two sons by Poseidon, Belus and Agenor. Now Belus ruled over the Egyptians and had the sons I mentioned earlier, while Agenor went to Phoenicia, married Telephassa, and had a daughter, Europa, and three sons, Cadmus, Phoenix, and Cilix. ∣ Some claim that Europa was the daughter of Phoenix and not of Agenor. ∣ 1 Zeus fell in love with her and changing himself into a tame bull, carried her on his back across the sea to Crete. There Zeus slept with her and she later gave birth to Minos, Sarpedon, and Rhadamanthys I although according to Homer [ Iliad 6. 198-99,], Sarpedon was the son of Zeus and Laodamia, daughter of Bellero- phon I. When Europa disappeared, her father Agenor sent his sons to look for her, ordering them not to return until they found her. Their mother, Telephassa, and Thasus, son of Poseidon ∣ or of Cilix, as Phere- cydes says ∣ , joined them in the search. When they were unable to find Europa after looking everywhere, they gave up the idea of returning home and settled in various places: Phoenix in Phoenicia; Cilix near Phoenicia (and he called all the land subject to him near the Pyramus River Cilicia); and Cadmus and Telephassa in Thrace. Thasus founded a city Thasus on an island near Thrace and settled there.

Asterius, the ruler of the Cretans, married Europa and reared her children. When they were grown up they quarrelled with each other for they all were in love with a boy named Miletus, a son of Apollo and Aria, daughter of Cleochus. Because the boy preferred Sarpedon, Minos fought his brother and won. Miletus fled to Caria where he founded a city which he called Miletus, after himself.2 Sarpedon fled to Cilix, with whom he allied himself in a war against the Lycians in return for a portion of land. He became king of Lycia and was allowed

2

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gods and Heroes of the Greeks: The Library of Apollodorus
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.