Maryland under the Commonwealth: A Chronicle of the Years 1649-1658

By Bernard C. Steiner | Go to book overview

gross falsity, alas, continued to be spread through the Province long after Cecilius's death.

This long letter, or declaration, was ordered by Baltimore to be read before the General Assembly, as had been done in the case of his letter of August, 1650, and to be published in the usual places of publishing the Proprietary's "ordinances and edicts."


V. THE COMMISSIONERS OF PARLIAMENT OF 1651.

The English Parliament, on October 3, 1650, passed an ordinance forbidding all trade or intercourse with Virginia and the West Indies for their "divers acts of Rebellion," and providing "that the Council of State shall have power to send ships to any of the plantations aforesaid, and to grant commissions to such persons as they shall think fit, to enforce all such to obedience, as stand in opposition to the Parliament, and to grant pardons, and settle governors in the said islands, plantations and places, to preserve them in peace, until the Parliament take further order."1 No steps were taken under this power for a year after it was given, until on September 26, 1651, Captain Robert Dennis, Mr. Richard Bennett, Mr. Thomas Stagg, and Captain William Claiborne were appointed Commissioners "for the reducing of Virginia and the inhabitants thereof to their due obedience to the Commonwealth of England."2 Although Maryland was not included in the colonies named in the ordinance of 1650, yet the Council of State seems not to have questioned that power had been given them to "enforce" Maryland "to obedience," if such enforcement were necessary. In the year between the passage of the ordinance and the instructions to the Commissioners all men

____________________
1
Bozman, II, 413.
2
3 Md. Arch., Coun., 265; Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XVII, 282. On Bennett see Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, III, 53, and New England Historical and Genealogical Register, January, 1894. He was born about 1622 and died about 1674. Claiborne is discussed by J. E. Cooke in Magazine of American History, X, 83; see also Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 1, 313, and Neill, Terra Mariae, 93.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Maryland under the Commonwealth: A Chronicle of the Years 1649-1658
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.