Maryland under the Commonwealth: A Chronicle of the Years 1649-1658

By Bernard C. Steiner | Go to book overview

longer, and Coursey and Gwyther had imposed on them by the council of war an oath not to write to Baltimore about the matter.1 The Puritan Commissioners followed with amercements and sequestrations of the property of some of the leading members of the Proprietary party, some of which we shall come upon in the proceedings of the Provincial Court, and the Province passed entirely out of the hands of Baltimore's officers for three years.


X. CONDITIONS AFTER THE WAR.

On April 24, 1655, Captain Robert Sly was made by the Commissioners one of their body, to act as a full Councilor, but especially to see to the "administration of justice and government in the limits of St. Mary's and Potomac." With Sly, John Hatch and John Lawson were appointed to issue writs for the courts, and the two latter should also assist Sly in "repelling and suppressing any opposition against the present government, made by the Lord Baltimore or any other."2 At the same time Captains John Smith and Peter Johnson were appointed as commanders of the military forces on both sides of Patuxent River, and Captain Smith was also appointed to take care of the sequestered estates of delinquents and to be muster master general for St. Mary's, Potomac, and Patuxent Counties.3 Captain Sampson Waring was appointed commander of the forces residing on Herring Creek, and Captains John Sly and Richard Hodgkeys were appointed to command the militia in St. Mary's and Potomac River. Captain John Sly was appointed President of the St. Mary's County court, and six Commissioners were named with him, three of whom were of the quorum. The same number of Commissioners was appointed for Patuxent County court, and it was ordered that the jurisdiction of these courts should be limited to three thousand pounds of tobacco and £20 sterling and to such criminal actions "as

____________________
1
Hammond, Hammond versus Heamans.
2
3 Md. Arch., Court., 315.
3
3 Md. Arch., Coun., 315; 10 Md. Arch., Prov. Ct., 412, 413, 417.

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