Maryland under the Commonwealth: A Chronicle of the Years 1649-1658

By Bernard C. Steiner | Go to book overview

nett had "gone into" Maryland and "countenanced some people there in opposing the Lord Baltimore's officers; whereby and with other forces from Virginia" Bennett had "much disturbed that Colony and people, to the endangering of tumults and much bloodshed there, if not timely prevented." Of this conduct Baltimore complained, as did "divers other persons of quality" in England, "who are engaged by great adventures in his interest," so Cromwell commanded Bennett and "all others deriving any authority from you" not to disturb "Baltimore, or his officers or people, in Maryland and to permit all things to remain as they were, before any disturbance or alteration made by you or by any other, upon pretence of authority from you; till the said differences above mentioned be determined by us here and we give further order therein." Bennett thereupon made further representations to Cromwell, and the Maryland Commissioners also wrote 1 Cromwell on June 29 giving their side of the case; so from Whitehall, on September 26, 1655, Cromwell wrote to the Commissioners of Maryland2 that a mistake had arisen concerning the January letter, which was being interpreted as directing that a stop be "put to the proceedings of those Commissioners who were authorized to settle the civil government of Maryland." Cromwell wrote that this "was not at all intended, nor indeed asked by Baltimore and his friends," but Cromwell wished to "prevent and forbid any force or violence to be offered" by either Virginia or Maryland to the other "upon the differences concerning their bounds," which differences were being considered by the Privy Council.


XI. JOSIAS FENDALL, GOVERNOR, 1656.

A year later Baltimore thought that the time had come for him to act, and on July 10, 1656, he appointed Josias Fendall Governor of the Province in place of Stone, to the end that there might be good government established, "for the

____________________
1
Carlyle, IV, 133.
2
Boman, II, 532. Bennett had gone to England.

-106-

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