CHAPTER XII
THE POLITICAL LEADER

THE North was awake, at last. Parker had chalked up ten victories for Slavery and but two for Freedom, but now all that would be changed. There were new Generals, and a new board of strategy. Away with the Fabian tactics of the past; the North was on the offensive, here was a party pledged to fight and leaders who were bold. "You have no idea of the change of feeling here," wrote Howe to Horace Mann, and Dana could tell Sumner that "There are few Compromise men left in Boston." All over the North there were stirrings of revolt. Massachusetts sent Henry Wilson to the Senate, Maine sent Fessenden, and from the President's own State came John Parker Hale. Ohio took Chase for Governor and put rough Ben Wade in his Senate seat, and all the genius of Douglas could not prevent the choice of Lyman Trumbull as his colleague from Illinois. Anthony Burns had done his work, and Douglas, with his Nebraska Bill.

At last Freedom was in earnest. Did Douglas speak for Squatter Sovereignty and the South, in its folly, applaud? Even while the Nebraska Bill was being debated in the Senate, Eli Thayer out in Worcester moved to beat the slave power at its own game. "It is much better," said Thayer, "to go and do something for free labor than to stay at home and talk of manacles and auction blocks and bloodhounds." So the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company was organized, and the board of Directors read like a roster of State Street merchants: Amos Lawrence and J. M. S. Williams and George Luther Stearns and Samuel Cabot; and from

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