The Diplomatic Background of the War, 1870-1914

By Charles Seymour | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
THE CRISIS OF 1914

It is incontestable that the murder of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand furnished an unexpected but not altogether unwelcome opportunity to German diplomats. Sincerely horrified by the brutality of the assassination of the heir apparent to the neighboring throne, they could not but realize that in it lay an opening for the aggressive action which their general policy demanded. Ever since the formation of the Franco-British Entente in 1904, Germany had watched the rise of an international opposition with increasing anxiety. The conditions under which Bismarck had maintained German hegemony had departed. Delcassé, by arranging the quarrels of France with Italy and Great Britain, had enabled France to free herself from German control and establish her diplomatic autonomy. Germany's failure to maintain her mastery of continental diplomacy was further manifested in 1907 when Great Britain and Russia ended their long quarrel and came to an understanding.

The conventions made by the Powers of the Triple Entente were not openly directed against Germany. But she saw in them a concerted policy designed to isolate the German Empire.1 In any case they

____________________
1
A very clear exposition of the belief prevalent in Germany since 1911 that Great Britain built up the Triple Entente in order to "encircle" and throttle Germany is to be found in an article by Th. Schiemann in New York Times Current History of the War, Vol. II,

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Diplomatic Background of the War, 1870-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Table of Contents ix
  • Chapter I- Introduction xvii
  • Chapter II- Bismarck and the Triple Alliance 12
  • Chapter III- The Dual Alliance 38
  • Chapter IV- German World Policy- Economic Factors 61
  • Chapter V- German World Policy- Moral Factors 89
  • Chapter VI- British Foreign Policy 115
  • Chapter VII- The Diplomatic Revolution 140
  • Chapter VIII- The Conflict of Alliances 166
  • Chapter IX 194
  • Chapter X- The Balkan Wars 221
  • Chapter XI- The Crisis of 1914 245
  • Chapter XII- The Diplomatic Break 266
  • Bibliography 288
  • Index 295
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.