Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics

By Alfred Korzybski | Go to book overview

NOTES AND REFERENCES

In the following references the bold face numbers refer to the numbers of the literature in the bibliography; p, or, pp, indicates the page or pages; ff, indicates following pages.

In many instances the number of the page is given, but in others, when I refer to a large subject, only the number of a book or paper is indicated, and in such cases the index of the given book should be consulted.

In other cases, when no references are given, and yet the serious and educated reader may occasionally feel perplexed, may I not suggest, in this connection, that wide experience has taught me that we usually forget the structural, not entirely common, subtleties of grammar. We also often ascribe to words a very limited, personal, and habitual range of meanings, and, so, some purely linguistic difficulties appear as mysterious 'scientific' difficulties, which they are not. The reader, on such occasions, will be surprised to find what an enormous amount of knowledge may be found in a mature occasional perusal of a good grammar or dictionary, the neglect of which acts as a psycho-logical blockage to the understanding.


CHAPTERII
1
-25.
3
-591, pp. 93, 94.

CHAPTER III
1
--The need of International Languages, or a Universal Language besides mathematics is becoming increasingly urgent. At present there are several such languages, and in many large cities there are organizations, usually called International Auxiliary Language Associations, with addresses listed in telephone directories. Any of these organizations will gladly supply information about the whole of the international linguistic movement. There is also a number of books written on this subject to be found in the larger public or university libraries. Informations about the Basic English of Ogden as a Universal Language, consisting of the astonishingly small number of 850 words, which do the work of about 20,000 words, may be obtained from the Orthological Institute, 10 King's Parade, Cambridge, England (see also 376, 377). In my opinion, the possibilities of the Basic for a scientific civilization are unlimited, provided the Basic is revised from a non- aristotelian, non-identity, point of view.

The general and serious defect of all of these languages is, that their authors have, as yet, entirely disregarded the non-aristotelian problems of non-identity, and so of structure, without which general sanity, or the elimination of delusional worlds is entirely impossible.


CHAPTER IV
1
--590.
2
--579, Vol. II, Part IV, *150 ff.; 455-457.
3
--590.
4
--457, p. 249.

CHAPTER VII
1
--317, 318, 319.
2
--83.

CHAPTER VIII
1
--92, pp. 50-52.
2
--91, 92.
3
--92, pp. 114, 119, 123, 242.
4
--564, 560, pp. 16 ff., 28 ff.

CHAPTER IX
1
--487.
2
--304, 7, Vol. II, p. 461 ff.
3
--214.
4
--7, Vol. II, p. 457.
5
--214. p.210.
6
--7, Vol. II, p. 458.
7
--7, Vol. II, p. 251.
8
--7, Vol. II, p. 634.
9
--7, Vol. II, p. 944.
10
-310, Chap. V.
12
--9, 10, 12, 13, 196, 210, 211, 370.
14
--7, Vol. II, p. 917 ff., 273, 313, 416
15
--7, Vol. II, p. 690.
16
--7, Vol. II, p. 961 ff.
17
--7, Vol. II, p. 644 ff.
18
--7, Vol. II, p. 803 ff.
19
--7, Vol. II, p. 869 ff.
23
--49.
24
--7, Vol. II, p. 59 ff.

-763-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 808

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.