Vital Issues in Christian Science: A Record of Unsettled Questions Which Arose in the Year 1909, between the Directors of the Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, Massachusetts, and First Church of Christ, Scientist, New York City

By Augusta E. Stetson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVIII
SELF-DEFENSE IN CHRISTIAN SCIENCE AS TAUGHT BY MARY BAKER EDDY

THERE is possibly nowhere else in religious literature a page of testimony like that which describes the method of self-defense on the part of Mrs. Stetson and the practitioners in their effort to withstand unjust criticism. The right to self-defense is not only fundamental in human relations, but it is also a primary dictum of our spiritual nature. The failure to recognize this fact, allowing evil suggestion to invade consciousness, is the source of untold torment to those who permit the thief of error to break into the house of their mentality, and to rob it of peace and possessions.

Unless the Christian Scientist knows how spiritually to defend his mentality against assault from without, there is no possibility of the peace of God dwelling therein, because he is not found clothed with the armor of God. In fact, spiritual mental self-defense in Christian Science is the veritable "whole armour of God" divinely provided to defeat error. For want of it, unrighteous, unjust, or unholy suggestion may steal its way into one's consciousness and reverse the whole contents by the denial of Truth; but with this defensive capacity well in hand, there is no fiery dart of evil which cannot be effectively turned.

Mental defense and treatment are different

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Vital Issues in Christian Science: A Record of Unsettled Questions Which Arose in the Year 1909, between the Directors of the Mother Church, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, Massachusetts, and First Church of Christ, Scientist, New York City
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