Mob Violence in the Late Roman Republic, 133-49 B.C

By John Wesley Heaton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
MOB VIOLENCE AND THE RISE OF MILITARY DICTATORS: SATURNINUS TO SULLA

It is especially unfortunate that our sources for the period from Saturninus to Sulla are meager and inadequate, for it was at this time that the violent disorders which characterized the days of Saturninus and Glaucia first took on the nature of civil war. The Gracchan reform of the courts, placing them under the control of the knights, proved of little value as justice was influenced through violence as well as bribery.1 The consular Publius Rutilius Rufus, famed for his honesty, ostentatiously withdrew to Asia because of his indignation at the conduct of judicial affairs in the city.2 When Lucullus impeached Quintus Servilius Caepio in 95 B.C., "the cause was argued with so much vehemence that they came to blows and several were wounded and some killed."3 The impeachment of Gaius Norbanus brought similar disturbances.4 Disorder in the assemblies became so commonplace that the senate sought to place responsibility for it upon the presiding magistrate.5 Meantime, the semi- oriental proletariat of Rome, in its desire for political favors, was getting out of hand, and the Italian allies were now prepared to fight for legal equality with the Romans.'

In 91 B.C., with the advent of the tribune Marcus Livius Drusus, son of that Drusus who had been pitted by the senate against Gaius Gracchus, the Gracchan program was again revived, this time, however, for the political advantage of the senatorial party.6 Yet so varied was his legislation that the author was destined to be misunderstood and therefore opposed by the very group he sought to aid. "For they did not perceive," commented Velleius Paterculus, a century later, "that whatever he brought forward in favor of the plebs was intended to allure and attract the multitude in order that, being gratified in smaller matters, they might consent to others of greater importance. Such indeed was the fate of Drusus that the senate favored the injurious proceedings of his colleagues more than his own excellent designs. . . . ."7 At this time, the consul Quintus Servilius Caepio had been fostering the quarrel between the knights and the senate, prosecuting many of the nobility for bribery. To counteract this attack, Drusus sought to align the masses to the senatorial support by the bait of the Gracchan laws. He proposed land allotments, colonization, cheap grain, and even a debasing of the

____________________
1
Flor., II, 5.
2
Livy, Per., LXX; Dio, XXVIII, 97; Oros., V, 17.
3
Plut., Lucul., 1; cf. Dio, XXVIII, 97.
4
Cic., de Off., II, 14.
5
Cic., de Leg., III, 19.
6
Sall., Ep. ad Caes., 6; Dio, XXVIII, 96, 2; Flor., II, 5.
7
Vel. Pat., II, 13.

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mob Violence in the Late Roman Republic, 133-49 B.C
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 108

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.