Christianity and Greek Philosophy: Or, the Relation between Spontaneous and Reflective Thought in Greece and the Positive Teaching of Christ and His Apostles

By B. F. Cocker | Go to book overview

CONTENTS.

A.
Abstraction, comparative and immediate, 187-189; 362-364.
Æschylus, his conception of the Supreme Divinity, 146; his recognition of human guilt, and need of expiation, 515-517.
Ætiological proof of the existence of God, 487-489.
Anaxagoras, an Eclectic, 311; in his physical theory an Atomist, 312; taught that the Order of the universe can only be explained by Intelligence, 312; his psychology, 313; the teacher of Socrates, 313.
Anaximander, his first principle the infinite,290; his infinite a chaos of primary elements, 290.
Anaximenes, a vitalist, 286; his first principle air, 287.
Aristotle, his opinion of the popular polytheism of Greece, 157; his classification of causes, 280, 404,405; his misrepresentations of Pythagorqs, 299; his classification of the sciences, 389; his Organon, 389-394; his Logic, 394-403; his Theology, 404-417; his Ethics, 417-421; his Categories, 395; his logical treatises, 396; on induction and deduction, 396-398; his psychology, 398, 401, on how the knowledge of first principles is attained, 394, 402, 403; on Matter and Form, 405-408; on Potentiality and Actuality, 408-412; his proof of the Divine existence, 412-415; on the chief good of man, 419, 420; his doctrine of the Mean, 420, 421; defect of his ethical system, 505.
'Aρψαί, or first principles, the grand object of investigation in Greek Philosophy, 271, 274, 279, 280.
Athenians, criticism on Plutarch's sketch of their character, 45; their vivacity, 45; love of freedom, 46 -- and of country, 46; private life of, 47; intellectual character of, 48; inquisitive and analytic, 48; rare combinations of imagination and reasoning powers, 49; religion of, 98; the Athenians a religious people, 102; their faith in the being and providence of God, 107; their consciousness of dependence on God, 110, 116; their religious emotions, 117; their deep consciousness of sin and guilt, 122-124; their sense of the need of expiation, 124, 125; their religion exerted some wholesome moral influence, 162, 163.
Athens, topography of, 27; the Agora, 28; its porticoes, 29; the Acropolis, 30; its temples, 31; the Areopagus, 33; sacred objects in, 98, 99; images of the gods, 99; localities of schools of philosophy in, 266-268.
Attica, geographical boundaries of, 26; a classic land, 34; its geographical and cosmical conditions providentially ordained for great moral ends, 34, 35; soil of, not favorable to agriculture, 40-necessitated industry and frugality, 41; the climate of, 41 -- its influence on the mental character of the people, 42.

B.
Bacon, his assertion that the search after final causes had misled scientific inquirers, 222.

C.
Categories of Aristotle, 395.
Causality, principle of, 189; assailed by the Materialists, 194 -- especially by Comte, 203-209; the intuition of power a fact of immediate consciousness, 204, consciousness of effort the type of all force,

-525-

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