Cerebral Mechanisms in Behavior the Hixon Symposium

By Lloyd A. Jeffress; California Institute of Technology Hixon Fund | Go to book overview
It would circle around the contour at which two areas of different potential are in contact. If one of these areas is surrounded by the other, and if the surrounded region is smaller, the density of the current would be maximal in this region, irrespective of its level of activity. More particularly, it would be maximal also in a circumscribed "black" region which is surrounded by "white." Now, a steady flow polarizes the tissue through which it passes, and since the intensity of the resulting electrotonus grows with the density of the flow, the obstruction would be greatest within the area of circumscribed objects, whatever their brightness may be. This is, of course, the same explanation of satiation as has been given above.Quite apart from questions which refer to the nature of satiation, is the present interpretation of our records actually tenable? Others are much more competent to answer this question than I am. In fact, I should like to assume a reserved attitude with regard to most explanations which have just been discussed. So far as my own views are concerned, there is a particular reason for caution. Our problem is closely related to many others. If it were really demonstrated that pattern vision is a matter of continuity physics, then we should be seriously tempted to believe that this holds also for analogous facts in other parts of psychology. Just because I realize that we are dealing with a major problem of psychophysics in general, I feel inclined to move slowly. It may be that the cortical correlate of pattern vision has now become accessible to experimentation. But we can not yet be sure that it has.
REFERENCES
1. Adrian, E. D., and Matthews B. H. C. "The Berger rhythm: Potential changes from the occipital lobes in man". Brain, 1934, 57, 322-351.
2. Gerard, R. W. "Factors controlling brain potentials". Cold Spring Harbor Symposia, 1936, 4, 292-304.
3. Gerard, R. W. "The interaction of neurones". Ohio J. Sci., 1941, 41, 160-172.
4. Gerard, R. W., and Libet B. The control of normal and "convulsive" brain potentials. Amer. J. Psychiat., 1940, 96, 1125-1153.
5. Gibson, J. J. "Adaptation, after-effect and contrast in the perception of curved lines". J. Exper. Psychol., 1933, 16, 1-31.
6. Jasper, H. H. "Cortical excitatory state and synchronism in the control of bioelectric autonomous rhythms". Cold Spring Harbor Symposia, 1936, 4, 320-339.
7. Köhler, W. The place of value in a world of facts. New York: Liveright Publishing Corp., 1938.
8. Köhler, W. Dynamics in psychology. New York: Liveriglit Publishing Corp., 1940.
9. Köhler W., and D Dinnerstein. In Miscel. Psychologica Albert Michotte. Louvain, 1947.

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