Cerebral Mechanisms in Behavior the Hixon Symposium

By Lloyd A. Jeffress; California Institute of Technology Hixon Fund | Go to book overview
directly to problems of mental function. From this point of view, the cell of the central nervous system and the germ plasm have this in common, that an essential aspect of their activity depends on the presence of template molecules. But in the case of the brain not all of the templates are an endowment but rather some arise from external stimuli. Organized protein structures are considered to have electrical conducting powers which are lacking in random aggregations of protein molecules. Szent-Györgyi (30) has recently applied such concepts of protein organization to the problem of muscle contraction. In accounting for electrical conductivity, he postulates that the "actual electrons of the protein particle form one common system belonging to the whole particle, in analogy to the modern theory of solids in which electrons belong to the whole system and cannot be correlated to single atoms," and that common conduction bonds extend over a great number of protein molecules. It is as if in the ordering or organization of protein chains, the outer electrons are abstracted from the protein particle to form a generalized conducting system.As to where the ordering of protein molecules takes place in the brain, several possibilites arise, including various components of the cell and its processes. It seems likely that nucleoproteins are involved since the ability to act as a template seems to be fairly well restricted to these substances. The possibility of a direct relationship between the ordering of protein molecules and certain mental processes arises in the observation of Hydén and Hartelius (16) that the protein-producing system is poorly developed in psychically disordered persons, and that, in certain ganglion cells from the cerebral cortex of the frontal lobes of persons suffering from psychic disorders, the amount of polynucleotides and proteins is markedly decreased as compared to those of healthy individuals.
REFERENCES
Bailey, P. "Concerning the organization of the cerebral cortex". Texas Reports Biol. Med., 1948, 6,34-56.
Beadle, G. W. "Biochemical genetics". Chem. Rev., 1945, 37,15-96.
Binet, A., and Simon, T. The intelligence of the feeble-minded. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins Co., 1916.
Breasted, J. H. The Edwin Smith surgical papyrus. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1930.
Brunswick, E., and Reiter, L. "Eindruckscharactere schematisierter Gesichter". Ztschr. f. Psychol., 1937, 142,67-134.
Caspersson, T. "The protein metabolism of the cell". Naturwissenschaften, 1941, 29,33-43.

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cerebral Mechanisms in Behavior the Hixon Symposium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 311

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.