Cerebral Mechanisms in Behavior the Hixon Symposium

By Lloyd A. Jeffress; California Institute of Technology Hixon Fund | Go to book overview

The Symposium from the Viewpoint of a Clinician

HENRY W. BROSIN* Department of Psychiatry, The University of Pittsburgh Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic

As you know, I did not come prepared to give a formal address but am honored that you have asked me for some extemporaneous comments on the general subject "The Symposium as Seen from the Viewpoint of a Clinician." This would appear to be a relatively simple assignment, because many topics of clinical interest have already been discussed in the formal lectures and the extensive interchange which followed them. However, you will sympathize with me in being discreet because hasty and impromptu impressions about this vast material could hardly do the subject matter justice. This exploratory learning has repeatedly shattered my cerebral organization to the extent that I marvel at the durability of the nervous system to maintain any identity at all!

I am especially grateful to the Hixon Fund Committee for including me, a clinician, although I have little apparent membership in this group of basic scientists whose attitudes toward the world in operation are so different from mine. The members who compose this symposium possess a catholicity, an over-all view, which augurs well for the future of intelligently supported learning. Often parochial attitudes are only too obvious, not only at scientific meetings but in universities and governmental agencies, so that good communication is prevented. For example, psychologists who favor statistical analysis often can find little good in those who utilize projective techniques, even though it would seem that both groups should find ways to bridge the gap separating them. The return at this time -- the output as compared to the intake -- may be quite small, but we can hope that all skills will make appropriate contributions.

0In his summary on Wednesday, Dr. Gerard furnished us with a neat diagram. He differentiated four levels of operation: molecular, neuronal network, cortical-psychological, and social man. The latter levels

____________________
*
At the time of this conference Dr. Brosin's affiliation was: Division of Psychiatry, The University of Chicago Department of Medicine.

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