From an Antique Land: Ancient and Modern in the Middle East

By Julian Huxley | Go to book overview

3
BYBLOS: DOORWAY OF MANY PASTS

BYBLOS . . . WHY DO I FIND MYself wanting to give you pride of place when Damascus and Istanbul open a vaster sweep, and Ur has yielded richer treasures, when Isfahan is more lovely, Petra and Palmyra more fantastically wonderful, Baalbek and Karnak more grandiose and impressive? I think it is because Byblos and the region around it, comprising as they do so many and so varied layers of the past, epitomize both the enduring and the shifting qualities of the Middle East and its history.

In any case, it became for me intellectually what it was for many centuries geographically -- the best gateway into and out of the region, opening doors into other countries and cultures; it is a window of vision on to the dim and distant times when man first bent the earth's fertility to his service, and in so doing came to grips, intellectually as well as practically, with the forces of life, death, and reproductive renewal.

To reach Byblos from Beirut, you drive northwards up the coast. Here is no fertile coastal plain, as in the southern half of the country, and the Lebanon breaks abruptly down to the sea in great buttresses. Among them leaps the Dog River, Nahr el Kelb. From the bridge which crosses it, you look up at a high and narrow gorge with an unusual amount of greenery, on whose rocky sides we found the little scented wild cyclamens and the narcissi flowering in November.

The main interest is in the inscriptions on the rocks. These, as Fedden writes, 'in hieroglyphics, cuneiform, Greek, Latin, and Arabic [and, he might have added, in English and French] evoke in the most striking way

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From an Antique Land: Ancient and Modern in the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Illustrations 7
  • I - Introduction 13
  • 2 - The Land 22
  • 3 - Byblos: Doorway of Many Pasts 31
  • 4 - Baalbek and the Proliferation of Divinity 57
  • 5 - Lebanon: Phoenician Land 67
  • 6 - Turkey: Past and Present 92
  • 7 - Modern Jordan and Ancient Petra 111
  • 8 - Damascus, Port of the Desert 134
  • 9 - Palmyra the Caravan Empire 143
  • 10 - North Syria and Its Dead Cities 159
  • 11 - Baghdad and the Twin Rivers 180
  • 12 - The Birth of Civilization 194
  • 13 - Persia and Its Blue Mosques 214
  • 14 - On the Banks of the Nile 227
  • 15 - Pyramids 238
  • 16 - The Egyptian Past 255
  • 17 - Knossos and the Minoan Civilization 278
  • 18 - And Las 291
  • Index 305
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.