King Richard II

By William Shakespeare; Peter Ure | Go to book overview

SCENE II.-- [The coast of Wales.]

Drums: flourish and colours. Enter KING RICHARD, AUMERLE,
the BISHOP OF CARLISLE, and Soldiers.)

Rich. Barkloughly castle call they this at hand?
Aum. Yea, my lord. How brooks your grace the air,
After your late tossing on the breaking seas?
Rich. Needs must I like it well: I weep for joy
To stand upon my kingdom once again.
5
Dear earth, I do salute thee with my hand,
Though rebels wound thee with their horses' hoofs.
As a long-parted mother with her child
Plays fondly with her tears and smiles in meeting,
So weeping, smiling, greet I thee, my earth,
10
And do thee favours with my royal hands;
Feed not thy sovereign's foe, my gentle earth,
Nor with thy sweets comfort his ravenous sense,
But let thy spiders that suck up thy venom
And heavy-gaited toads lie in their way, 15

Scene 11

MATERIAL. Richard's landing at "Barclowlie" in Wales, after a stormy passage (suggested by Hol.,499/1/17), and hearing news of various disasters to his cause, viz, the loss of the Welsh, the "great forces which the duke of Lancaster had got togither" ( Hol., 499/1/74; ll. 106 ff), the execution of the favourites, and various defections north and south, all appear on the same page (499) of Holinshed. According to Holinshed, Richard had already heard in Ireland of Bolingbroke's coup; in Shakespeare, he enters conscious of what has happened but knowing no datails. His melancholy and despair are immensely expanded and vivified from Holinshed's account. There is no need to suppose with Wilson that any of the French chroniclers influenced this s cene; but see notes on ll. 64, 119.

1. Barkloughly] Holinshed's "Barclowlie" Castle, an error for Hert­ lowli, the form used by the Monk of Evesham, Holinshed's authority at this point, for the modern Harlech.

2. brooks] endures, with some of the O.E. sense, "enjoys" ( Herford).

6. salute] to greet with word or gesture; now restricted to the military sense.

8-10.] The imagery recalls Joan's plea to the Duke of Burgundy, 1 H 6, 111. iii. 47-51.

9. tears and smiles]Cf. v. ii. 32 and note.

15-22. heavy-gaited] Not used else­ where by Shakespeare, but cf. 2 Re­ turn from Parnassus, ed. Leishman,

____________________
11. favours]Q1; fauour Q2-5, F.
9. tears]Q1, 4; teares, Q2, 3, 5, F.
1. they]Q1; you Q2-5, F.
S.D.]Wright. Enter the King, Aumerle, Carleil &c. Qq; Drums: Flourish, and Colours. Enter Richard, Aumerle, Carlile and Soldiers. F.
Location.]Capell, adding "A castle in view"; not in Qq, F.

-94-

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King Richard II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Arden Shakespeare ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Preface to the Fifth Edition (1961) viii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • Characters - (in Order of Speaking) 2
  • The Tragedy of King Richard the Second 3
  • Scene III.-- [the LIsts at Coventry.] 16
  • Scene IV. -- [the Court] - [ Enter the King with Bagot and Greene at One Door; and the Lord Aumerle at Another.] 21
  • Act II 46
  • Scene II.--[windsorcastle.] 69
  • Scene IV. --[a Camp in Wales.] 88
  • Act III 90
  • Scene II.-- [the Coast of Wales.] 94
  • Scene IV. --[the Duke of York's Garden.] 105
  • Act IV 124
  • Act V 145
  • Scene III.--[windsor Castle.] 152
  • Scene IV. -- [windsor Castle.] 159
  • Scene V. -- [a Prison at Pomfret Castle.] 169
  • Scene VI.--[windsor Castle.] 177
  • Appendix I 181
  • Appendix II 198
  • Appendix IV 207
  • Additional Notes to Text and Commentary 208
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