New America: Politics and Society in the Age of the Smooth Deal

By Karl E. Meyer | Go to book overview

7/
Fortress of Yesterday

And I reflected that if anything in Washington deserved such imperial housing, it was now the United States Supreme Court . . . it has survived to become today perhaps the most morally impressive of our original institutions.

-- EDMUND WILSON

OF ALL THE PARADOXES of contemporary politics, none seems quite so baldly improbable as that involving the Supreme Court of the United States. In the traditional liturgy of the left, the Court was the citadel of privilege, a place to be viewed with wary suspicion or outright hostility. During the height of the New Deal fight over the Supreme Court, Drew Pearson and Robert S. Allen complained bitterly, "It is easier to change the ruling head of the European monarchal system, which we shook off, than the Supreme Court's decree." And: "Curb the Court before it destroys the Nation," urged the liberal Philadelphia Record in 1936. But twenty years later, virtually the identical words were being used by the spokesmen of the right. The American Bar Association, which used to discuss the Court in tones of hushed reverence, became so critical

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New America: Politics and Society in the Age of the Smooth Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents ix
  • Beforeword - The Fallen Idol 1
  • Part One / Symptoms 5
  • 2 - Washington: Leviathan, Inc. 18
  • 3 / - The Coming of the Smooth Deal 34
  • 4/ - Suitors in the Cloakroom 48
  • 5/ - Texas Leaves Its Landmarks 62
  • 6 - That Image in the White House 75
  • 7/ - Fortress of Yesterday 85
  • 8/ - The Soothing Cassandras 99
  • Part Two / Sources 117
  • 10 - The Twilight of Regionalism 127
  • 11 - The Old in Heart 136
  • 12 - Bohemia Moves Uptown 146
  • 13/ - Who Killed the Bull Moose? 158
  • 14 - Signposts to Futopia 167
  • 15 - The Two Worlds 181
  • Afterword - The Sweet Smell of Excess 190
  • Acknowledgments and Sources 197
  • Index of Names 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.