New America: Politics and Society in the Age of the Smooth Deal

By Karl E. Meyer | Go to book overview

15
The Two Worlds

Sometimes I thank God for the Russians--their rapid progress may even make economic growth, risk, and adventure essential, if not respectable, here.

-- ADLAI STEVENSON

"HOW FASHIONS CHANGE! Ten years ago left- wing convictions were modish among 'well-informed public opinion'. . . . Now the right thing is, not to be a Conservative (that would be too positive an attitude) but to show a studied indifference to party politics, and to express quizzical doubts about the socialist belief that human society can be improved by political action."

So R. H. S. Crossman wrote in 1955--a Briton speaking about the British. But variations on the same theme can be found in hundreds of articles in American magazines during the past decade. Not the least of the ties that now bind us to Britain is the common language of disillusion. For in Britain, too, campaign strategy in politics has passed from the political believers to the mass market analyst.

In an article in The Reporter, George Steiner has offered a persuasive analysis of the decline of the Labour Party.

-181-

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New America: Politics and Society in the Age of the Smooth Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents ix
  • Beforeword - The Fallen Idol 1
  • Part One / Symptoms 5
  • 2 - Washington: Leviathan, Inc. 18
  • 3 / - The Coming of the Smooth Deal 34
  • 4/ - Suitors in the Cloakroom 48
  • 5/ - Texas Leaves Its Landmarks 62
  • 6 - That Image in the White House 75
  • 7/ - Fortress of Yesterday 85
  • 8/ - The Soothing Cassandras 99
  • Part Two / Sources 117
  • 10 - The Twilight of Regionalism 127
  • 11 - The Old in Heart 136
  • 12 - Bohemia Moves Uptown 146
  • 13/ - Who Killed the Bull Moose? 158
  • 14 - Signposts to Futopia 167
  • 15 - The Two Worlds 181
  • Afterword - The Sweet Smell of Excess 190
  • Acknowledgments and Sources 197
  • Index of Names 207
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