The Century, 1847-1946

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The Year 1947

THE first year of the second century of the Club was marked by several events of importance to Centurions: The celebration of our actual birthday, January 13; the appointment of a Centennial Fund Committee--William A. Lockwood, Chairman--and the declaration by the Board of Managers and the Committee that "no list of contributing members and their gifts will ever be made public"; the pageant of April 26, described in another chapter of this volume; a cocktail party to which every Centurion was invited, given by the Cosmopolitan Club, in honor of the Century's hundredth anniversary; and the announcement of the publication of our centenary history.

The January 13 meeting opened in the Library, with President Parsons in the chair. Some four hundred members were present, including three guests of honor, who had been elected while the Club-House was on Fifteenth Street: Dr. Walter Damrosch, Dr. Nicolas Murray Butler, and Robert Kelly Prentice. Our oldest member, who is also the member of longest membership, Poultney Bigelow, was ice-bound at his home up the Hudson; and as the President said, "it was only the weakness of a machine, the predilection of a motor-car to skid, which kept him away."

The President read messages of congratulation and fraternal greeting from The Athenaeum and from the Garrick Club, of London.

Leonard Bacon read the following poem written by him for the occasion:

A hundred years of mirth and grace
And noble conversation
Have made this house Delight's high place
And local habitation.

Here a departed pleasure lives;
And vanished personality
Retains for later fugitives
"The whiff of immortality."

-279-

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The Century, 1847-1946
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • The Century, 1847-1946 1
  • The Century, 1867-1886 25
  • The Century, 1907-1926 80
  • The Century, 1927-1946 102
  • The Century and American Art 154
  • Poets and the Century 184
  • Memoirs of Centurian Architects 205
  • The Century Library 226
  • The Committee on Admissions 232
  • Finances of the Century 238
  • Drink and Food 259
  • Billiards and Cowboy 273
  • The Year 1947 279
  • Centennial Celebration 282
  • Founders, Officers, Honorary Members 299
  • An Album of Centurions 303
  • Centurions: 1847-1946 363
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