Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form

By Tarik A. Fathy | Go to book overview

Then, it concludes the impact of new information technologies and the emergence of telecity concept by proposing four public policy implications. The study suggests standardization and deregulation policies of new information technologies infrastructure, the reconsideration of land use regulation and zoning, and public investment in conventional infrastructure policies to reflect changes in work activity and its relation to residential areas. Far from being comprehensive, this study concludes by recommending directions for further studies.


NOTES
1
In villages, networks tend to be overlapping, comprehensive, and in that sense closed, whereas in cities they are nonoverlapping and openended toward variety, diversity of interests, and pluralistic standards and styles ( Keller 1977, 283). Also see Marx and Engels ( 1977).
2
Few studies focus on technological consequences for the city. Mostly, brief statements are interspersed in the literature. Generally, these statements are projections into the future, based on fragile assumptions of what the writers believe ( Gottmann 1977).
3
The " California Group" are researchers sharing similar viewpoints on new socioeconomic conditions. They wrote a series of studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Their work has appeared in a number of working papers of the Institute of Urban and Regional Development at Berkeley, and in several books such as High Technology, Space and Society and High-Tech America. They are fundamentally involved in studying the new space of production and industrial location decisions on the regional scale, without any attention to the dynamics of city scale.
4
Several one-dimensional or partial views on the relationship between technological change and society have been advanced. Technology is seen by some as an autonomous force developed according to its own internal laws. Others see it as an almost unmitigated curse: technology is said to rob people of their jobs, their privacy, their values and beliefs. The third view, which tends to be held by historians for whom continuity is an indispensable assumption, considers technology unworthy of special attention. They argue that improved communications and education (fundamentally technological) are responses to society's technological changes, and that rate of technological adoption is roughly in equilibrium with man's social and psychological development ( Mesthene 1970).

-9-

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Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Technology and Society 11
  • Notes 23
  • 3 - The Emergence of the Information Society 25
  • Notes 47
  • 4 - An Application of Futures Research 49
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Telecity: A Theoretical Analysis 77
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Telecity Form and Structure: Review and Conclusion 93
  • Appendix A - LIst of Panelists 105
  • Appendix B - The Delphi Exercise 109
  • Bibliography 133
  • Index 153
  • About the Author *
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