Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form

By Tarik A. Fathy | Go to book overview

and strongly tie city components and activities, simply enough, to the customized individual.

Thus, in each of the three perspectives, space has a central position due to the advancement of information technologies. First, it becomes the focus of the visual image of the city in which observers perceive the built environment in nodal hierarchical patterns built around spaces. Second, it becomes the place for concentrated activities and services in delocalized, multinodal structures, nesting mixed uses, information services, new places of production, and teleworking centers in which leisure and work are mingled. Third, it serves as a social gathering place where diffusion of innovations and an exchange of ideas, behavior, and culture are accommodated. The versatile role and associated functions of spaces make them essential to identify levels of distributed structures. It becomes more difficult to identify the real location unless multilevel structures are apparent with high rates of redundancy.


NOTES
1
Since the beginning of systematic study of society, social scientists have been interested in the quest for social change. However, they have studied social transformation processes without much notice of the spatial configuration of that change.
2
Image is based on knowledge of the environment. Messages about this environment consist of information, which are structured experience which endows them with meaning to produce changes in the image ( Boulding 1969). The environment, then, is a language of communication, with a syntactic and semantic structure.
3
For a complete account of changes in city patterns, see Morris ( 1972). Use of the gridiron system is not exclusive for the post-automobile city. Greek and Roman cities were dominated by the "mesh" of paths.
4
Christaller's ( 1966) central place theory and that of Lüsch ( 1954) claimed that services are distributed according to hierarchical and spatial pattern. Earlier, Thönen ( 1966) provided the land rent model, in which land rent differentials over space are explained solely by access to consumers, or in other words, transport cost savings.
5
These theories are static, although restorative changes occur after every shift in resources or when obstacles to free market play are imposed or removed.

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Telecity: Information Technology and Its Impact on City Form
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Technology and Society 11
  • Notes 23
  • 3 - The Emergence of the Information Society 25
  • Notes 47
  • 4 - An Application of Futures Research 49
  • Notes 76
  • 5 - Telecity: A Theoretical Analysis 77
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Telecity Form and Structure: Review and Conclusion 93
  • Appendix A - LIst of Panelists 105
  • Appendix B - The Delphi Exercise 109
  • Bibliography 133
  • Index 153
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 155

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.