If we can bring the reader to say, "I do not agree",--as is more than probable,--then it is hoped we may also stimulate him to explain, at least to himself, just 'how', in what way, he disagrees.

Questions as to 'why' come from the child or the immature adult who must look to some final authority who determined all in advance. We have no answers to 'why' and hold no blueprints for the future. "The pageant of the moment passes, but still comes."


NOTES
(1)
"Something of the horrors of war, and much too much of the worse horrors of peace" H. L. Mencken confesses to have seen, in his "Newspaper Days" ( Knopf, 1941). "On five several occasions I have been offered the learned degree of 'legum doctor', though few men are less learned in the law than I am, or have less respect for it; and at other times I have been invited to come in and be lynched by the citizens of three of the great Christian states of the Union. Such prodigies and monstrosities I could pile up for hours."

The chief 'horror' that impresses Irvin Cobb is the inevitable moral and intellectual degradation. In his autobiographical "Exit Laughing" ( Bobbs-Merrill, 1941) he tells, "In Flanders and in France I had seen War . . . stripped of all the spurious passementerie in which the stay-at-home exploiters of quickened young flesh and supple young bones delight to dress it up. I mean the profiteers and buccaneers; editorial incendiaries and street-corner agitators and professional saber-rattlers . . . mousy diplomatists and swinish contractors; and behind these, the enterprising munition-makers seeking commerce in any governmental market. . . . English-built machine guns . . . even then were mowing down Englishmen, and German shells . . . killing German troops. . . . I had seen the flower of the youth of Europe turned into pestilential carrion and decent men reduced to the level of beasts." Cobb cannot "look upon war as pageantry or majesty or spiritual transformation", but as "a bloated abortion with dollar marks on its flanks . . . dragging its gross belly across the face of the land, rending and spoiling what all it does not devour".

Cobb is a humorist. That means the tears run down inside. For often the funny man is at heart serious. Aristophanes could slay his enemies with laughter, and Voltaire run them through with his rapier of wit and satire. The wise man in King Lear must play the Fool. Like all king's jesters, Mark Twain, Will Rogers, Bernard Shaw draw the laugh to escape the sting of the whip.

So, joining the ranks of the jesters, Cobb quotes Jacques, "Motley's the only wear. I am ambitious for a motley coat. . . . I must have liberty withal, as large a charter as the wind, to blow on whom I please; for so fools have. . . . Invest me in my motley; give me leave to speak my mind, and I will through and through cleanse the foul body of the infected world, if they will patiently receive my medicine".

-17-

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War and Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By Porter Sargent 4
  • Title Page 5
  • Table of Contents 9
  • This Title 15
  • Notes 17
  • This Book 19
  • Notes 23
  • Power Increase 25
  • Notes 27
  • Technological Advance 29
  • Notes 33
  • Economic Consequences 37
  • Notes 45
  • Political Effects 49
  • Notes 51
  • Social Repercussions 53
  • Notes 60
  • Centralizing Tendencms 65
  • Notes 68
  • Unifying the Nation 71
  • Notes 75
  • Nationalizing Educational Control 79
  • Notes 85
  • War Predicted by the Wise 89
  • Notes 98
  • Confused Educators 105
  • Notes 112
  • Retreat to the Past 119
  • Notes 128
  • Adjustnmnt is Painful 135
  • Notes 141
  • Unity Versus Heresy 145
  • Notes 152
  • Our Educational Leadership 161
  • Notes 166
  • 'Reforming' Static Education 168
  • Notes 171
  • Maintaining the Social System 173
  • Notes 182
  • Hopes of Reconsiruction 189
  • Notes 197
  • The Wife of the State 207
  • Notes 213
  • Ideals Without Vision 219
  • Notes 224
  • We Teach What's Left 229
  • Nons 240
  • Piecemeal Additions 245
  • Notes 249
  • Sterile Scholarship 251
  • Notes 261
  • Worship of Facts 265
  • Notes 270
  • Seedbeds for Propaganda 272
  • Notes 276
  • Education for Frustration 279
  • Notes 285
  • Youth the Scapegoat 287
  • Notes 295
  • Morale and Education 298
  • Notes 302
  • Health and Morale 305
  • Notes 310
  • Vitamins Will Win 313
  • Notes 317
  • War and the Children 319
  • Notes 324
  • Manufacturing Criminals 327
  • Notes 333
  • Has Education Improved Our Intellect? 337
  • Notes 344
  • Failure of the Intellect in Wartime 351
  • Notes 359
  • Control--By Whom and for What? 361
  • Notes 369
  • How Universities Are Controlled 371
  • Notes 378
  • How Foundations Influence 387
  • Notes 402
  • How Governments Perpetuate Themselves 411
  • Notes 415
  • Guiding Public Opinion 419
  • Notes 424
  • Notes 437
  • Distorting History 443
  • Building Ideologies 447
  • Changing Directions 451
  • Getting Down to Earth 455
  • Yearning for Security 459
  • Going Head First 463
  • Turning Eyes Forward 467
  • Getting Understanding 473
  • Index 479
  • Publishers Books Quoted Or Reviewed 505
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