SOCIAL REPERCUSSIONS

Change, 'the only constant', always certain and inevitable, must always meet with inertia, delay, opposition. Any body, human or heavenly, which is at rest or is moving in a given direction according to one of the fundamental laws of physics, will continue to do just what it was doing unless acted on by some other force. But it is only in a theoretical universe that there would be no other force, or that rest would be more than relative. In this universe where every particle of matter attracts every other particle with a force proportional to the square of the distance, there are plenty of other forces. And as every event in the past continues to have its effect on every event today and in the future, the play of change is fascinatingly complex.

In his essay on "Poetry and Imagination" Emerson applies both. "The magnificent hotel and inconveniency we call Nature is not final . . . nothing stands still in nature but death . . . creation is on wheels in transit. . . . Thin or solid everything is in flight . . . everything undressing and stealing away from its old into new form."

Individuals or groups of individuals or nations fail to recognize forces playing about them and through inertia are for a time unchanging. They come to the attitude that the ancient order, legalized and protected by police methods, by military force even to total warfare, may be indefinitely continued. It is endowed by its devotees with qualities of permanence. Legally right becomes morally right. (1)

The new, then, has always to be bootlegged in. We have to take the world as we find it, but the bootleggers don't have to leave it that way. And there would be no bootleggers were there not those who want something they can't easily get. The contented stand in the way of readjustment of our education and ways of life to the great changes which are swirling about us. Change is brought about by the discontented who want what is illegal, even immoral. (2)

This damming of the stream under flood conditions, this delay in adjusting to new conditions has brought the break, the great revolution that is on, of which current wars are incidents. "If you take thirty years to do half an hour's work, you will presently have to do thirty years' work in

-53-

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War and Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By Porter Sargent 4
  • Title Page 5
  • Table of Contents 9
  • This Title 15
  • Notes 17
  • This Book 19
  • Notes 23
  • Power Increase 25
  • Notes 27
  • Technological Advance 29
  • Notes 33
  • Economic Consequences 37
  • Notes 45
  • Political Effects 49
  • Notes 51
  • Social Repercussions 53
  • Notes 60
  • Centralizing Tendencms 65
  • Notes 68
  • Unifying the Nation 71
  • Notes 75
  • Nationalizing Educational Control 79
  • Notes 85
  • War Predicted by the Wise 89
  • Notes 98
  • Confused Educators 105
  • Notes 112
  • Retreat to the Past 119
  • Notes 128
  • Adjustnmnt is Painful 135
  • Notes 141
  • Unity Versus Heresy 145
  • Notes 152
  • Our Educational Leadership 161
  • Notes 166
  • 'Reforming' Static Education 168
  • Notes 171
  • Maintaining the Social System 173
  • Notes 182
  • Hopes of Reconsiruction 189
  • Notes 197
  • The Wife of the State 207
  • Notes 213
  • Ideals Without Vision 219
  • Notes 224
  • We Teach What's Left 229
  • Nons 240
  • Piecemeal Additions 245
  • Notes 249
  • Sterile Scholarship 251
  • Notes 261
  • Worship of Facts 265
  • Notes 270
  • Seedbeds for Propaganda 272
  • Notes 276
  • Education for Frustration 279
  • Notes 285
  • Youth the Scapegoat 287
  • Notes 295
  • Morale and Education 298
  • Notes 302
  • Health and Morale 305
  • Notes 310
  • Vitamins Will Win 313
  • Notes 317
  • War and the Children 319
  • Notes 324
  • Manufacturing Criminals 327
  • Notes 333
  • Has Education Improved Our Intellect? 337
  • Notes 344
  • Failure of the Intellect in Wartime 351
  • Notes 359
  • Control--By Whom and for What? 361
  • Notes 369
  • How Universities Are Controlled 371
  • Notes 378
  • How Foundations Influence 387
  • Notes 402
  • How Governments Perpetuate Themselves 411
  • Notes 415
  • Guiding Public Opinion 419
  • Notes 424
  • Notes 437
  • Distorting History 443
  • Building Ideologies 447
  • Changing Directions 451
  • Getting Down to Earth 455
  • Yearning for Security 459
  • Going Head First 463
  • Turning Eyes Forward 467
  • Getting Understanding 473
  • Index 479
  • Publishers Books Quoted Or Reviewed 505
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