centralized government to harmonize them. In the heat of war, to secure success maximum production is essential whatever privileges of the two contending forces must be sacrificed.

Drucker's line of thought follows closely upon James Burnham's "The Managerial Revolution" ( John Day, 1941) who in turn was stimulated by the close analytical thinking of Lawrence Dennis. Getting beneath the foam of abstractions to detect such deep-running currents is to risk the danger of drowning.

The trends hidden in the news of the day, the flotsam on the swiftening current, the evidence of the quickening tide that would soon sweep and scour,--all these were seen by but few.

Henry Stanley Haskins in his recently acknowledged "Meditations in Wall Street" (published anonymously, Morrow, 1940, with an introduction by Albert Jay Nock) had a weather eye and words to voice his premonitions. "Sometimes you see little changes fluttering their pennons to show you that a great change is on its way."


NOTES
(1)
"The American Roots of Fascism", Yankee, Feb., 1938, by Porter Sargent, dealt with Yankee innovations which had been adopted and adapted by the Fascist countries,--summer camps utilizing children's wasted summers, vigilante and Ku Klux methods, the third degree, the punitive use of the rubber hose and the like.

In many American households children are still forbidden to do this or that. They are repressed which often results in frustration. That makes the things forbidden alluring. In adult life, also, we run up against the old Puritanical tendency to forbid and suppress. Many adults, when released from authority, finding they have money in their pockets to buy these prohibited things, yield to sex allure and alcoholic excess or the exhilaration or false ecstasy they have been denied. That creates a market for which there will be purveyors. Laws are enacted to regulate or suppress night clubs or burlesque shows or whatnot. That establishes a profitable and vested interest in securing exemption so there is an incentive on the part of these interests for more prohibitory laws to be passed that further exemptions may be sold with which to derive revenue to silence enforcement agencies. This vicious circle leads to the spending of much money to secure election of officers who have the power to appoint these enforcement officers. And so Puritanism, Protestant or Catholic, wrecks Democracy.

(2)
A list of over a hundred Acts which delegated to the President powers "not specified by the Constitution", was inserted in the Congressional Record at the request of Sen. Wiley of Wisconsin, July 5, 1939.
(3)
The increase in the number of federal employees under President Roosevelt

-68-

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War and Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By Porter Sargent 4
  • Title Page 5
  • Table of Contents 9
  • This Title 15
  • Notes 17
  • This Book 19
  • Notes 23
  • Power Increase 25
  • Notes 27
  • Technological Advance 29
  • Notes 33
  • Economic Consequences 37
  • Notes 45
  • Political Effects 49
  • Notes 51
  • Social Repercussions 53
  • Notes 60
  • Centralizing Tendencms 65
  • Notes 68
  • Unifying the Nation 71
  • Notes 75
  • Nationalizing Educational Control 79
  • Notes 85
  • War Predicted by the Wise 89
  • Notes 98
  • Confused Educators 105
  • Notes 112
  • Retreat to the Past 119
  • Notes 128
  • Adjustnmnt is Painful 135
  • Notes 141
  • Unity Versus Heresy 145
  • Notes 152
  • Our Educational Leadership 161
  • Notes 166
  • 'Reforming' Static Education 168
  • Notes 171
  • Maintaining the Social System 173
  • Notes 182
  • Hopes of Reconsiruction 189
  • Notes 197
  • The Wife of the State 207
  • Notes 213
  • Ideals Without Vision 219
  • Notes 224
  • We Teach What's Left 229
  • Nons 240
  • Piecemeal Additions 245
  • Notes 249
  • Sterile Scholarship 251
  • Notes 261
  • Worship of Facts 265
  • Notes 270
  • Seedbeds for Propaganda 272
  • Notes 276
  • Education for Frustration 279
  • Notes 285
  • Youth the Scapegoat 287
  • Notes 295
  • Morale and Education 298
  • Notes 302
  • Health and Morale 305
  • Notes 310
  • Vitamins Will Win 313
  • Notes 317
  • War and the Children 319
  • Notes 324
  • Manufacturing Criminals 327
  • Notes 333
  • Has Education Improved Our Intellect? 337
  • Notes 344
  • Failure of the Intellect in Wartime 351
  • Notes 359
  • Control--By Whom and for What? 361
  • Notes 369
  • How Universities Are Controlled 371
  • Notes 378
  • How Foundations Influence 387
  • Notes 402
  • How Governments Perpetuate Themselves 411
  • Notes 415
  • Guiding Public Opinion 419
  • Notes 424
  • Notes 437
  • Distorting History 443
  • Building Ideologies 447
  • Changing Directions 451
  • Getting Down to Earth 455
  • Yearning for Security 459
  • Going Head First 463
  • Turning Eyes Forward 467
  • Getting Understanding 473
  • Index 479
  • Publishers Books Quoted Or Reviewed 505
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