Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979

By Jonathan C. Brown | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
AS YOU SOW, SO SHALL YOU REAP

Argentine Labor and the Railway Nationalization

MARÍA CELINA TUOZZO

The study of the relationship between labor and capital in the British-owned railway companies in Argentina from 1930 to 1948 reveals an ongoing struggle that had the work- place as its principal terrain of conflict. This chapter's focus on labor processes and workplace relations questions the stereotype of the workers as irrational actors, uncritically obeying the commands of their populist leader. 1 By changing the perspective of the analysis, this study also seeks to revise the highly baroque and exotic imagery of the Argentine railway nationalization as a demagogic and sentimental concession of the caudillo, Juan Domingo Perón, to the xenophobic masses. Argentine workers and their employers have always been engaged in an occasionally fierce, customarily subtle, but always constant struggle over control of the shop floor. Studying the workplace raises new questions. What was it like to work for the British railway companies? How did their work shape the experience of railroaders? How did the workers transform their work? Why did they unanimously support the state's buying of the British railways despite knowing of the system's deterioration and decay?

When dealing with the workers' experience in the workplace, the scholar needs to inquire about management. It is imperative to introduce the employers into the analysis, lest the scenery assumes an unreal appearance, as if workers were struggling only against phantoms. 2 Therefore, this chapter also analyzes the managerial structure of the British-owned railway system. How did management-labor relations evolve? How did the average railroader relate to the supervisors and foremen? Who had the authority to rule the workers,

-128-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.