Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979

By Jonathan C. Brown | Go to book overview

they had once justified the nationalization of the railways. Meanwhile, the workers continue to resist by organizing massive railway strikes that, from time to time, paralyze Buenos Aires, its populated suburbs, and the country's interior. It is the same resistance they have been mounting for nearly a century.


Notes

The author wishes to thank Joel Horowitz, Torcuato S. Di Tella, Paul Goodwin Jr., and Rodney Anderson for their helpful comments.

1.
Social historians of Latin America are moving beyond the assumed passivity of the working class. Among others are Elizabeth Jelín, La protesta obrera ( Buenos Aires, 1974); Joel Horowitz, Argentine Unions, the State, and the Rise of Peron, 1930-1945 ( Berkeley, 1990); Daniel James, "Rationalisation and Working Class Response: The Context and Limits of Factory Floor Activity in Argentina," Journal of Latin American Studies 13 ( 1981): 375-402; Samuel Bailey, Movimiento obrero, nacionalismo y política en la Argentina ( Buenos Aires, 1986); Juan Carlos Torre, ed., La fonnación del sindicalismo peronista ( Buenos Aires, 1988).
2.
Howard F. Gospel, "Managerial Structures and Strategies: An Introduction," in Managerial Strategies and Industrial Relations, ed. Howard F. Gospel and Craig R. Litter ( London, 1983), 1-24.
3.
Honorio Roigt, Presente y futuro de los ferrocarriles argentinos ( Buenos Aires, 1956), 30-35. For more information on technological innovation in the railway industry and its social and political aspects, see Fred Cottrell, Technological Change and Labor in the Railroad Industry ( Lexington, Mass., 1970).
4.
The nationalization process, however, is complex, and labor was one of the many variables involved. Specific studies on the Argentine workers and Perón's nationalization policies rarely focus on the shop floor. In contrast, they stress the economic, political, and ideological dimensions. See Bailey, Movimiento obrero; Hiroshi Matsushita, Movimiento obrero argentino: Sus proyecciones en los orígenes del peronismo ( Buenos Aires, 1983).
5.
For more detailed studies of Argentine development, see Eduardo P. Archetti et al., Latin America ( London, 1987); Charles Bergquist, Labor in Latin America: Comparative Essays on Chile, Argentina, Venezuela, and Colombia (Stanford, 1986); Torcuato S. Di Tella , Latin American Politics ( Austin, 1989). See especially Paul B. Goodwin Jr. , Los ferrocarriles británicos y la Unión Cívica Radical, 1916-1930 ( Buenos Aires, 1974); Paul B. Goodwin Jr., "The Politics of Rate-making: The British-owned Railways and the Unión Cívica Radical, 1921-1928," Journal of Latin American Studies 6 ( November 1974): 257-87.
6.
Confederación General del Trabaio: Anuario ( Buenos Aires, 1948), Fundación Simón Rodríguez Archive, Buenos Aires. See also Heidi Goldberg, "Railroad Unionization in Argentina, 1912-1929" ( Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1979); Alfredo López, Historia del movimiento social y la clase obrera argentina ( Buenos Aires, 1971), 217.

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.