Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979

By Jonathan C. Brown | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
STRUGGLING FOR EMANCIPATION

Tungsten Miners and the Bolivian Revolution

ANDREW BOEGER

Years of struggle to exert control over their lives fostered the capacity of Bolivia's mineworkers to influence the course of national politics. Working in an industry subject to the whims of the international market and living in remote communities owned by their employers shaped their struggle for control in three fundamental ways. First, these factors forced the workers to address a wide variety of issues. Second, they spurred them to devise creatively an array of tactics and strategies to counter the overwhelming power of the mining companies. Third, the vagaries of international markets and the power of the employers made the workers temper their struggle for control with efforts to achieve job security. An examination of the workers at one mining community, Chojlla (pronounced CHOK'ya), permits an intimate analysis of the relationship between local labor struggles, the economic structure, and national politics.

Chojlla's geographical isolation obliged the workers to confront the company on many different fronts. Like workers in other settings, the Chojlla mineworkers fought to improve their wages and working conditions. However, since they felt the company's presence in many other aspects of their lives, the miners were forced to extend their efforts into many areas that urban workers did not. The company owned and operated the local hospital, the elementary school, and most important, the company store. The company paid for the local constabulary and owned the homes of the workers. The company literally owned the soil on which the employees walked and under which most of them worked--and more than a few of them were buried. Everywhere

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Workers' Control in Latin America, 1930-1979
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.