A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910-1948

By Bryant Simon | Go to book overview

APPENDIX

Data for Tables A.1 through A.5 are from a variety of sources. For countywide returns, I consulted Alexander Heard, Southern Primaries and Elections, 1920- 1949 ( 1950), 106-11. For precinct-level returns, see Anderson Independent, September 12, 1934, August 31, 1938; Beaufort Gazette, September 13, 1934; Easley Progress, September 10, 1924, September 10, 1930, September 13, 1934, September 1, 1938; Gaffney Ledger, September 11, 1924, September 11, 1930, September 13, 1934, September 1, 1938; Georgetown Times, September 14, 1934, September 2, 1938; Greenville News, September 10, 1924, September 10, 1930, September 13, 1934, September 1, 1938; Lee County Messenger, September 1, 1938; Manning Times, September 12, 1934, August 31, 1938; Orangeburg Times and Democrat, September 12, 1934, August 31, 1938; Rock Hill Evening Herald, September 10, 1924, September 10, 1930, September 12, 1934, August 31, 1938; Spartanburg Herald, September 10, 1924, September 10, 1930, September 12, 1934, August 31, 1938; and Union Daily Times, September 10, 1924, September 10, 1930.

For the purposes of these tables, I defined the low country simply as a geographic area. My sample for the low country includes returns from the counties of Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell, Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Clarendon, Colleton, Dillon, Florence, Georgetown, Hampton, Horry, Jasper, Marion, Orangeburg, and Williamsburg. Upcountry counties include Abbeville, Anderson, Cherokee, Chester, Fairfield, Greenville, Greenwood, Lancaster, Laurens, Newberry, Oconee, Pickens, Saluda, Spartanburg, Union, and York.

Town precincts are defined as those precincts within city limits; only town precincts in the upcountry are included. Therefore Charleston and other lowcountry cities are excluded. Almost without exception, these precincts are listed in the newspapers as wards. For instance, the Greenville News listed returns for four city wards. For mill precincts, I counted the returns from all precincts that bore the same names as the mills in the areas. For rural areas, I considered any precincts not clearly urban or mill, with less than 150 voters, to be rural.

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